Joe Brainard

Joe Brainard

I Remember

By Joe Brainard; Ron Padgett (Editor); Joe Brainard (Illustrator)

Granary Books, Paperback, 9781887123488, 192pp.

Publication Date: February 2, 2001

Description
Joe Brainard's "I Remember" is a literary and artistic cult classic, praised and admired by writers from Paul Auster to John Ashery and Edmund White. As autobiography, Brainard's method was brilliantly simple: to set down specific memories as they rose to the surface of his consciousness, each prefaced by the refrain "I remember": "I remember when I thought that if you did anything bad, policemen would put you in jail." Brainard's enduring gem of a book has been issued in various forms over the past thirty years. In 1970, Angel Hair books published the first edition of "I Remember," which quickly sold out; he wrote two subsequent volumes for Angel Hair, "More I Remember" (1972) and "More I Remember More" (1973), both of which proved as popular as the original. In 1973, the Museum of Modern Art in New York published Brainard's "I Remember Christmas," a new text for which he also contributed a cover design and four drawings. Excerpts from the Angel Hair editions appeared in "Interview," "Gay Sunshine," "The World" and the "New York Herald." Then in 1975, Full Court Press issued a revised version collecting all three of the Angel Hair volumes and added new material, using the original title "I Remember." This complete edition is prefaced by poet and translator Ron Padgett.


About the Author
Joe Brainard (1942-1994) left Tulsa at eighteen for New York City and soon became a part of the thriving downtown art scene and the New York School of poets and painters. Over his career, Brainard created a prodigious body of work, distinguished by its breadth, originality, and rare alchemy of sensuality and precision, sophistication and sweetness. Admired for his writing as well as his visual art, Brainard wrote the legendary and beloved memoir I REMEMBER, which was hailed as "a masterpiece" by Paul Auster and inspired George Perec's Je me souviens. Brainard's drawings, assemblages, collages, and paintings are in private and museum collections, including those of the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of America Art, and a major travelling retrospective was organized by the Berkeley Art Museum in 2001 and included a stop at MOMA P.S 1.

Ron Padgett is a celebrated translator, memoirist, and "a thoroughly American poet, coming sideways out of Whitman, Williams, and New York Pop with a Tulsa twist" (Peter Gizzi). His poetry has been translated into more than a dozen languages and has appeared in The Best American Poetry, The Norton Anthology of Postmodern American Poetry, The Oxford Book of American Poetry, and on Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac. He was also a guest on Keillor's A Prairie Home Companion in 2009. Padgett is a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets and his most recent books include HOW LONG, HOW TO BE PERFECT, JOE: A MEMOIR OF JOE BRAINARD, and IF I WERE YOU. Born in Oklahoma, he lives in New York City and Calais, Vermont.

Joe Brainard (1942-1994) left Tulsa at eighteen for New York City and soon became a part of the thriving downtown art scene and the New York School of poets and painters. Over his career, Brainard created a prodigious body of work, distinguished by its breadth, originality, and rare alchemy of sensuality and precision, sophistication and sweetness. Admired for his writing as well as his visual art, Brainard wrote the legendary and beloved memoir I REMEMBER, which was hailed as "a masterpiece" by Paul Auster and inspired George Perec's Je me souviens. Brainard's drawings, assemblages, collages, and paintings are in private and museum collections, including those of the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of America Art, and a major travelling retrospective was organized by the Berkeley Art Museum in 2001 and included a stop at MOMA P.S 1.