Like a Charm (Paperback)

A Novel in Voices

By Karin Slaughter

William Morrow Paperbacks, 9780060583316, 384pp.

Publication Date: May 26, 2015

Other Editions of This Title:
Compact Disc (6/1/2004)
Hardcover (5/1/2004)
MP3 CD (6/1/2004)

List Price: 15.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

New York Times bestselling authors including Karin Slaughter, Lee Child, Peter Robinson, Laura Lippman, John Connolly, and others, combine their talents to deliver a brilliant tour-de-force in this clever suspense novel that revolves around one object—a charm bracelet—and the harrowing circumstances that plague the unlucky people who come into contact with it.

Linked by a glittering charm bracelet that brings misfortune to everyone who handles it, Like a Charm is a novel in sixteen chilling parts written by the cream of US and UK crime writers. From nineteenth-century Georgia, where the bracelet is forged in fire, to wartime Leeds, a steam train across Europe, the violent backstreets of 1980s Scotland, present-day London, a Manhattan taxi, the Mojave Desert and back to Georgia, each writer weaves a gripping story of murder, betrayal and intrigue.

A must-have collection for fans of suspense fiction, Like a Charm is a mesmerizing, masterful story that makes for compulsive, just-one-more-chapter reading.



About the Author

Karin Slaughter is one of the world’s most popular and acclaimed storytellers. Published in 120 countries with more than 35 million copies sold across the globe, her nineteen novels include the Grant County and Will Trent books, as well as the Edgar-nominated Cop Town and the instant New York Times bestselling novels Pretty Girls, The Good Daughter, and Pieces of Her. Slaughter is the founder of the Save the Libraries project—a nonprofit organization established to support libraries and library programming. A native of Georgia, she lives in Atlanta. Her novels Pieces of Her, The Good Daughter, and Cop Town are in development for film and television.



Praise For Like a Charm: A Novel in Voices

“Riveting.”
— Washington Post