The Heir of Night (Mass Market)

The Wall of Night Book One (Wall of Night series #1)

By Helen Lowe

Harper Voyager, 9780061734045, 480pp.

Publication Date: September 28, 2010

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (1/1/2012)
Paperback (3/1/2011)

List Price: 7.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

“A richly told tale of strange magic, dark treachery, and conflicting loyalties, set in a well realized world.”
—Robin Hobb, author of Dragon Keeper


An award-winning poet and acclaimed author of Young Adult fiction, Helen Lowe  now brings us The Heir of Night—the first book in her four-volume Wall of Night series, a brilliant new epic fantasy saga of war, prophecy, betrayal, history, and destiny. A thrilling excursion into a  richly imagined realm of strife and sacrifice, where the fate of a dangerously divided world rests in the hands of one  young woman, The Heir of Night is a fantasy classic in the making, sure to stand alongside the much beloved works of J.R.R. Tolkien, Robin McKinley, and Guy Gavriel Kay.



About the Author

Helen Lowe is an award-winning novelist, poet, interviewer, and blogger, whose first novel, Thornspell (Knopf), was published to critical praise in 2008. Her second, The Heir of Night (The Wall of Night Series, Book One) won the Gemmell Morningstar Award 2012. The sequel, The Gathering of The Lost, was shortlisted for the Gemmell Legend Award in 2013. Helen has a second-dan black belt in the martial art aikido and represented her university at fencing. She posts regularly on her ". . . on Anything, Really" blog, occasionally on SF Signal, and is also on Twitter: @helenlowe.



Praise For The Heir of Night: The Wall of Night Book One (Wall of Night series #1)

“The Heir of Night by Helen Lowe is a richly told tale of strange magic, dark treachery and conflicting loyalties, set in a well realized world.”
— Robin Hobb

“Lowe’s first novel, a series opener, calls to mind the inchoate evil of Barbara Hambly’s classic ‘Darwath Trilogy’ and reinvigorates the epic fantasy with appealing characters and a richly detailed world.”
— Library Journal