Who Is Mark Twain? (Hardcover)

By Mark Twain

Harperstudio, 9780061735004, 208pp.

Publication Date: April 21, 2009

May 2009 Indie Next List

“Mark Twain's unpublished writings give us a candid look at a writer already well known for his wit and irreverence. This new collection contains among its gems the rejected first draft of a lecture (including notes for an accompanying slide show), a political article thought too provocative for its time, and a story that prefigures Six Feet Under, thought too tasteless by Twain's family to publish. Great stuff from one of America's most celebrated men of letters.”
— Sean Chiki, The Booksmith, San Francisco, CA
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Description

" Twain] was, in the phrase of his friend William Dean Howells, 'the Lincoln of our literature'... At the heart of his work lies that greatest of all American qualities: irreverence."
-- Washington Post

"More than 100 years after Twain] wrote these stories, they remain not only remarkably funny but remarkably modern.... Ninety-nine years after his death, Twain still manages to get the last laugh."
-- Vanity Fair

Who Is Mark Twain? is a collection of twenty six wickedly funny, thought-provoking essays by Samuel Langhorne Clemens--aka Mark Twain--none of which have ever been published before, and all of which are completely contemporary, amazingly relevant, and gut-bustingly hilarious.



Praise For Who Is Mark Twain?

“Who Is Mark Twain? is a refreshing reintroduction to both [Twain’s] critical analytical thought and his playful sense of humor.”
-Los Angeles Times

“Twain’s wit and lethally precise powers of description are on full display in Who Is Mark Twain?”
-Maud Newton

“More than 100 years after [Twain] wrote these stories, they remain not only remarkably funny but remarkably modern….Ninety-nine years after his death, Twain still manages to get the last laugh.”
-Vanity Fair

“[Twain] was, in the phrase of his friend William Dean Howells, ‘the Lincoln of our literature’…At the heart of his work lies that greatest of all American qualities: irreverence.”
-Washington Post

“As funny and insightful as any of [Twain’s] published and well-known works, these essays take on the federal government, religion, race, fame, and even the literary canon with a sharp-eyed clarity we can chuckle over as we read while feeling uncomfortable knowing that they feel all too contemporary.”
-Walter Mosley

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