The Testament of Jessie Lamb (Paperback)

By Jane Rogers

Harper Perennial, 9780062130808, 240pp.

Publication Date: May 15, 2012

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Description

In a chilling future, one 16-year-old girl is driven to the ultimate act of heroism. The Testament of Jessie Lamb, longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, is the breakout novel from award-winning author Jane Rogers. Its cunningly drawn characters and riveting vision of a dystopic future fraught with difficult moral choices will make The Testament of Jessie Lamb an instant favorite for fans of Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games, and Brian K. Vaughan's Y: The Last Man.

"The novel does not set up an elaborate apocalypse, but astringently strips away the smears hiding the apocalypses we really face. Like Jessie's, it is a small, calm voice of reason in a nonsensical world." --The Independent



Praise For The Testament of Jessie Lamb

“The novel does not set up an elaborate apocalypse, but astringently strips away the smears hiding the apocalypses we really face. Like Jessie’s, it is a small, calm voice of reason in a nonsensical world.”
-The Independent

“Jane Rogers has captured Jessie’s voice brilliantly, alternating a teenager’s solipsism with a growing awareness of the wider world. Jessie’s self-conviction is both admirable and infuriating, and the reader is torn between her clear, unequivocal conclusions and the intricate, heartfelt compromises of her parents.”
-Times Literary Supplement (London)

“A powerful dystopian novel…Long-listed for the Booker Prize, Rogers’ mesmerizing tale is frighteningly timely and bound to spark rich book-club discussions.”
-Booklist

“Thought-provoking, smart, real, disturbing, and well-written...A compelling page-turner of a novel.”
-Popmatters

“Echoes of Kazuo Ishiguro’s stealthy novel Never Let Me Go abound, but Rogers works with a more populist tool kit, nailing the tempestuous inner conflicts of a young woman as she discerns the full measure of selfishness required to be selfless.”
-New York Times Book Review

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