Empires, Nations, and Families: A New History of the North American West, 1800-1860 (Paperback)

A New History of the North American West, 1800-1860

By Anne F. Hyde

Ecco Press, 9780062225153, 640pp.

Publication Date: October 2, 2012

Advertisement

Description

"Ingenious. A magnificent scholarly achievement. A sweeping new narrative account of western] history. A book to ponder and plunder."
--Virginia Scharff, Western Quarterly Review

"Not only well researched and presented but instantly absorbing."
--Adrienne Caughfield, Journal of American History

Pulitzer Prize nominee and winner of the Bancroft Prize--historical writing's most prestigious award--Empires, Nations, and Families is an epic work of American History that fills in the blanks on the map of the American West between 1800 and 1860. Historian Anne F. Hyde--author of An American Vision: Far Western Landscape and National Culture and co-author (with William Deverell) of The West in the History of the Nation--tells a riveting true story of Native Americans, entrepreneurs, fur trappers and fur traders in a vibrant "wilderness" to which Daniel Boone himself was a Johnny-come-lately.



About the Author

Anne F. Hyde is a professor of history at Colorado College. She is the author of "An American Vision: Far Western Landscape and National Culture" and coauthor, with William Deverell, of "The West in the History of the Nation."


Praise For Empires, Nations, and Families: A New History of the North American West, 1800-1860

“A sharp reframing of the history of the early Western frontier in personal terms. Elegantly written . . . with a vast dramatis personae and stage, Hyde’s book sheds considerable light on the 19th-century development of the nation.”
-Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“Ingenious. A magnificent scholarly achievement. . . . A sweeping new narrative account of [Western] history. A book to ponder and plunder.”
-Virginia Scharff, Western Historical Quarterly

“Provocative. A book that is not only well researched and presented but instantly absorbing.”
-Adrienne Caulfield, Journal of American History

Advertisement