The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto (Paperback)

By Mitch Albom

Harper Paperbacks, 9780062294432, 368pp.

Publication Date: October 25, 2016

December '15 Indie Next List

“According to the Spirit of Music, the narrator of Albom's latest novel, everyone joins a band in life --some of them play music, while others can be in a band of friendship, romance, or career. Frankie's music is so powerful that he can actually affect people's futures with the six magic strings on his guitar, but this gift becomes a burden for Frankie, impacting his loves and friendships, and ultimately, his life. Albom offers a story destined to become a classic that will have readers looking at music differently than they ever have before.”
— Karen Briggs (W), Great Northern Books and Hobbies, Oscoda, MI
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Description

"Talent is a piece of God's shadow, and under that shadow, human stories intersect."

A Spanish war orphan born in a burning church and raised by a blind guitar teacher, Frankie Presto was gifted with extraordinary musical abilities that shape not only his life but the lives of those around him. At nine years old, Frankie meets the love of his life, Aurora; that same day, civil war tears apart his home and he is sent to America, smuggled in the bottom of a boat with only guitar and six strings imbued with the power to change lives.

Relying on music to survive, Frankie's talent weaves him through the musical landscape of the twentieth century, from Detroit's jazz scene and the Grand Ole Opry, to Elvis mania and Woodstock--all the while searching for Aurora.

As his fame grows, Frankie finds love, friendship, and celebrity. Even so, his gift becomes his burden, driving a wedge between him and his beloved Aurora--now his wife. Overwhelmed by life, loss, and the power of his strings, Frankie disappears for years, only to reemerge in a spectacular and mysterious farewell.

With its Forrest Gump-like journey through the music world, The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto is a classic in the making. "Everyone joins a band in this life," Albom observes, "only some of them play music."

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