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Stick Dog Gets the Tacos

Tom Watson

Hardcover

List Price: 12.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Perfect for fans of Big Nate, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, and the previous Stick Dog books, Tom Watson’s hilarious series continues with a backyard adventure complete with crunchy tacos, squishy guacamole, and flying unicorns!

HEY! WHAT’S THAT IN THE TREE? IT’S AN EMERGENCY!

When Karen sprints into Stick Dog’s pipe and declares an emergency, Stick Dog springs into action. After racing through the woods with his squad of strays, Stick Dog discovers there’s no crisis at all. But there is a great opportunity to feed his hungry friends.

As a family of humans plans to feast on tacos, tortilla chips, and guacamole, Stick Dog makes plans of his own. To feed Mutt, Karen, Poo-Poo, and Stripes, he’ll need all his smarts and problem-solving skills.

While his hungry, drooling, goofy friends prepare to chow down, something nags Stick Dog at the edge of his mind. What is that thing swinging in a tree? And how can he get it?

If this funny, madcap, daring quest succeeds, it’s taco time for these crazy canines!


Other favorites in the series include Stick Dog Wants a Hot Dog, Stick Dog Chases a Pizza, and many more!

HarperCollins, 9780062685186, 224pp.

Publication Date: February 5, 2019



About the Author

Tom Watson lives in Chicago with his wife, daughter, and son. He also has a dog, as you could probably guess. The dog is a Labrador-Newfoundland mix. Tom says he looks like a Labrador with a bad perm. He wanted to name the dog "Put Your Shirt On" (please don't ask why), but he was outvoted by his family. The dog's name is Shadow. Early in his career Tom worked in politics, including a stint as the chief speechwriter for the governor of Ohio. This experience helped him develop the unique, storytelling narrative style of the Stick Dog books. More important, Tom's time in politics made him realize a very important thing: Kids are way smarter than adults. And it's a lot more fun and rewarding to write stories for them than to write speeches for grown-ups.