Zlateh the Goat and Other Stories (Paperback)

By Isaac Bashevis Singer, Maurice Sendak (Illustrator)

HarperCollins, 9780064401470, 104pp.

Publication Date: October 10, 1984

List Price: 7.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Nobel laureate Isaac Bashevis Singer introduces readers to the village of Chelm in this Newbery Honor Book. Chelm is a village of fools. The most famous fools—the oldest and the greatest—are the seven Elders. But there are lesser fools too: a silly irresponsible bridegroom; four sisters who mix up their feed in bed one night; a young man who imagines himself dead. Here are seven magical folktales spun by a master storyteller, that speak of fools, devils, schlemiels, and even heroes—like Zlateh the goat.

The New York Times called Zlateh the Goat and Other Stories, "beautiful stories for children, written by a master." The New York Book Review said, "This book is a triumph. If you have no older children on your list, buy it for yourself." Singer's extraordinary book of folklore is illustrated by Maurice Sendak, who won a Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are.

Supports the Common Core State Standards



About the Author

Isaac Bashevis Singer was one of the last great Yiddish authors and received world acclaim for his rich and haunting novels of Jewish life and folklore. In 1978, he received the Nobel Prize for Literature. He was also the recipient of two National Book Awards and three Newbery Honor Awards. Zlateh the Goat, a 1967 Newbery Honor Book, was his first book for children.

Maurice Sendak’s children’s books have sold over 30 million copies and have been translated into more than 40 languages. He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are and is the creator of such classics as In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, Higglety Pigglety Pop!, and Nutshell Library. In 1970 he received the international Hans Christian Andersen Medal for Illustration, in 1983 he received the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award from the American Library Association, and in 1996 he received a National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, Sendak received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an annual international prize for children’s literature established by the Swedish government.