Cold Comfort Farm (Paperback)

By Stella Gibbons, Lynne Truss (Introduction by), Roz Chast (Illustrator)

Penguin Books, 9780143039594, 233pp.

Publication Date: March 28, 2006

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Description

"Quite simply one of the funniest satirical novels of the last century." --Nancy Pearl, NPR's Morning Edition

The deliriously entertaining Cold Comfort Farm is "very probably the funniest book ever written" (The Sunday Times, London), a hilarious parody of D. H. Lawrence's and Thomas Hardy's earthy, melodramatic novels. When the recently orphaned socialite Flora Poste descends on her relatives at the aptly named Cold Comfort Farm in deepest Sussex, she finds a singularly miserable group in dire need of her particular talent: organization.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


About the Author

Stella Dorothea Gibbons (1902-1989) was born in London. A novelist, poet and short-story writer, her first novel, Cold Comfort Farm, won the Femina Vie Heuruse Prize for 1933. Amongst her other novels are Miss Linsey and Pa, Nightingale Wood, Westwood, Conference at Cold Comfort Farm, and Beside the Pearly Water (1954). Lynne Truss is a writer and journalist. She is the author of the number one bestseller, Eats, Shoots & Leaves, which has sold more than two million copies, won the national British Book Award, and was on the New York Times bestseller list or forty-five weeks. She lives in Brighton, England. Roz Chast is a regular cartoonist for The New Yorker, and her work has also appeared in Redbook, Scientific American, Fast Company, and the Harvard Business Review. Her memoir, Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, was a finalist for the National Book Award.
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