Rebels, Turn Out Your Dead (Hardcover)

By Michael Drinkard

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 9780151011193, 288pp.

Publication Date: February 1, 2006

List Price: 24.00*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

In his cannabis-infused pipe dreams, Salt imagines himself a man of independent means, rather than a Yankee hemp farmer under the thumb of his Tory father-in-law. Then Salt's teenage son shoots a British officer, and the Revolutionary War comes home, bringing both danger and unexpected freedoms.

Forced to flee his farm and family, Salt is taken captive on a prison ship off the shore of Brooklyn, where he finds himself in unplanned pursuit of something that might just be happiness. With her husband on this odyssey, Molly embarks upon her own war of independence, from the chronic disappointments and long-rehearsed roles of marriage. And under the unlikely wing of the British army, son James begins to come of age along with his country.

Based on real events, Rebels, Turn Out Your Dead is a historical novel with a decidedly contemporary sensibility and a fresh take on the many meanings of liberty.



Praise For Rebels, Turn Out Your Dead

PRAISE FOR MICHAEL DRINKARD
Drinkard is not only a sly observer of the way some of us live now but a writer capable of making us laugh and shake our heads with him. -- Cosmopolitan

[Drinkard] has a keen eye for detail, a sense of irony and the ability to draw sharply defined characters."--David W. Madden, San Francisco Chronicle Review




"Drinkard is a gifted writer who mixes irony, rollicking humor, and high drama . . . A well-drawn historical fiction."


-Booklist

"Playful, funny, brisk, beautiful. A genuinely rousing adventure told at full gallop with a unique contemporary spirit."


-Bret Easton Ellis

"A bold, audacious, and thoroughly enjoyable novel, about an all-too-forgotten moment in American history."


-Kevin Baker, author of Paradise Alley

"An imaginative, unique take on American history, charged with the subtleties of shifting and treacherous loyalties, and all wonderfully human."




-Kirkus Reviews