Reduction and Predictability of Natural Disasters (Proceedings Volume XXV Santa Fe Institute Studies in the Sci #25) (Paperback)

By John Rundle, William Klein, Don Turcotte

Routledge, 9780201870497, 323pp.

Publication Date: January 17, 1996

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Hardcover (7/12/2019)

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Description

Within the past five years, the international community has recognized that it may be possible, through programs of systematic study, to devise means to reduce and mitigate the occurrence of a variety of devastating natural hazards. Among these disasters are earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, and landslides. The importance of these studies is underscored by the fact that within fifty years, more than a third of the world's population will live in seismically and volcanically active zones. The International Council of Scientific Unions, together with UNESCO and the World Bank, have therefore endorsed the 1990s as the International Decade of Natural Disaster Reduction (IDNDR), and are planning a variety of programs to address problems related to the predictability and mitigation of these disasters, particularly in third-world countries. Parallel programs have begun in a number of U.S. agencies.


About the Author

John B. Rundleis a professor of geological sciences and a Fellow in the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is actively involved in founding the Colorado Center for Chaos and Complexity, a new teaching and research center at the University of ColoradoDonald L. Turcotteis the Maxwell Upson Professor of Engineering in the Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is author of Fractals and Chaos in Geology and Geophysics and coauthor of GeodynamicsWilliam Kleinis professor of physics and engineering at Boston University. He is involved in the application of the methods of Statistical Mechanics to problems in Geophysics. John B. Rundleis a professor of geological sciences and a Fellow in the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is actively involved in founding the Colorado Center for Chaos and Complexity, a new teaching and research center at the University of ColoradoDonald L. Turcotteis the Maxwell Upson Professor of Engineering in the Department of Geological Sciences, Cornell University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is author of Fractals and Chaos in Geology and Geophysics and coauthor of GeodynamicsWilliam Kleinis professor of physics and engineering at Boston University. He is involved in the application of the methods of Statistical Mechanics to problems in Geophysics.