The Future of Law and Economics (Hardcover)

Essays in Reform and Recollection

By Guido Calabresi

Yale University Press, 9780300195897, 248pp.

Publication Date: January 26, 2016

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (9/12/2017)

List Price: 35.00*
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Description

In a concise, compelling argument, one of the founders and most influential advocates of the law and economics movement divides the subject into two separate areas, which he identifies with Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill. The first, Benthamite, strain, “economic analysis of law,” examines the legal system in the light of economic theory and shows how economics might render law more effective. The second strain, law and economics, gives equal status to law, and explores how the more realistic, less theoretical discipline of law can lead to improvements in economic theory. It is the latter approach that Judge Calabresi advocates, in a series of eloquent, thoughtful essays that will appeal to students and scholars alike.


About the Author

Guido Calabresi is a senior judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and former dean and Sterling Professor Emeritus at Yale Law School.


Praise For The Future of Law and Economics: Essays in Reform and Recollection

"Eloquent, thoughtful essays that will appeal to students and scholars alike."—Lawrence Solum, Legal Theory Blog

"Many readers will find much of interest in Calabresi’s engaging ruminations."—Eric Posner, Journal of Economic Literature

"Calabresi is persuasive in arguing that economists (and the rest of us) can learn a lot from careful investigation of what legal systems actually do."—Cass Sunstein, New York Review of Books

"A passionate and convincing intellectual tour-de-force."—The Italian Law Journal

"A collection of original essays by one of the towering figures in the development of the economic analysis of law."—Sam Peltzman, University of Chicago

"Valuable and novel food for thought to the academic community and to the world at large."—Francesco Parisi, University of Minnesota