The Whisperers (Paperback)

Private Life in Stalin's Russia

By Orlando Figes

Picador, 9780312428037, 784pp.

Publication Date: November 25, 2008

List Price: 28.00*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

A New York Times Notable Book of 2007

"A tremendous achievement."--The Sunday Times (London)

The Whisperers is a triumphant act of recovery. In this powerful work of history, Orlando Figes chronicles the private history of family life during the violent and repressive reign of Josef Stalin. Drawing on a vast collection of interviews and archives, The Whisperers re-creates the anguish of family members turned against one another--of the paranoia, alienation, and treachery that poisoned private life in Russia for generations. A panoramic portrait of a society in which everyone spoke in whispers, The Whisperers is "rigorously compassionate. . . . A humbling monument to the evil and endurance of Russia's Soviet past and, implicitly, a guide to its present" (The Economist).



About the Author

Orlando Figes is the author of eight books on Russia that have been translated into twenty-seven languages; they include The Whisperers, A People’s Tragedy, Natasha’s Dance, and Just Send Me Word. A professor of history at Birkbeck, University of London and a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, Figes is the recipient of the Wolfon History Prize, the W. H. Smith Literary Award, the NCR Book Award, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, among others.


Praise For The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin's Russia

“Its importance cannot be overestimated. . . . This book should be made compulsory reading in Russia today.” —The Times (London)

“Extraordinary . . . Victims do not always make good witnesses. But thanks to Figes, these survivors overcame their silence and have lifted their voices above a whisper.” —The New York Times Book Review

“A profound service . . . Figes redeems the gloom by demonstrating compassion for flawed human beings and revealing compelling examples of moral courage and kindness.” —The Christian Science Monitor

“An extraordinary work of synthesis and insight . . . an awfully good read . . . Figes is both a prodigious researcher and a gifted writer.” —St. Petersburg Times

“Lucid, thorough, and essential to understanding Stalinist society . . . an exemplary study in mentalits.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Extraordinary.” —The New Yorker