Central Park in the Dark (Paperback)

More Mysteries of Urban Wildlife

By Marie Winn

Picador, 9780312428839, 320pp.

Publication Date: June 23, 2009

Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (6/24/2008)

List Price: 17.00*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

"Central Park in the Dark "explores a natural world that flourishes in the midst of a crowded and mechanized city. These exuberant essays lead the reader through the cycle of seasons as experienced by nocturnal beasts (raccoons, bats, black skimmers), insects (moths, wasps, fireflies, crickets), and other denizens of the park's trees and swamps and thickets. Alongside a cadre of amateur and expert naturalists, Marie Winn reveals a world that lies hidden in the dark between the bright lights and traffic of Fifth Avenue and Central Park West.



About the Author

MARIE WINN has spent most of her life in New York City, and lives not far from Central Park. She has written for "The Wall Street Journal," "The New York Times," and other publications, and is the author of "Red-Tails In Love: Pale Male's Story "and "The Plug-In Drug: Televisions, Computers and Family Life."


Praise For Central Park in the Dark: More Mysteries of Urban Wildlife

"Central Park in the Dark is a delight; I'd follow Winn into the park at any hour."--The New York Times Book Review

"A delightful chronicle of the animals that come out to hunt and play in the park at night . . . conveys the magic and enduring mysteries of Central Park."--Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"Winn is an engaging writer, making us care about the evening denizens of the park (human or otherwise)."--Booklist

"Winn's book is a revelation. . . . A worthy addition to any nature lover’s shelf."--Buffalo News

"Exuberantly illuminates Central Park’s vibrant 843-acre nocturnal world."--Kirkus Reviews

"From screech owl rescues to slug sex, Winn pulls the reader into this tight-knit circle of people all searching for the same thing: a glimpse of nature in the midst of the hustle and bustle of the city."--The Christian Science Monitor