Crazy Rich Asians (Paperback)

By Kevin Kwan

Anchor Books, 9780345803788, 527pp.

Publication Date: May 20, 2014

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Description

The acclaimed international bestseller ("A dizzily shopaholic comedy." --The New York Times) soon to be a MAJOR MOTION PICTURE starring Constance Wu, Henry Golding, Michelle Yeoh and Gemma Chan

When New Yorker Rachel Chu agrees to spend the summer in Singapore with her boyfriend, Nicholas Young, she envisions a humble family home and quality time with the man she hopes to marry. But Nick has failed to give his girlfriend a few key details. One, that his childhood home looks like a palace; two, that he grew up riding in more private planes than cars; and three, that he just happens to be the country's most eligible bachelor.

On Nick's arm, Rachel may as well have a target on her back the second she steps off the plane, and soon, her relaxed vacation turns into an obstacle course of old money, new money, nosy relatives, and scheming social climbers.


About the Author

Kevin Kwan was born and raised in Singapore. He currently lives in Manhattan. Crazy Rich Asians is his first novel.


Praise For Crazy Rich Asians

“A dizzily shopaholic comedy. . . . Wickedly delectable. . . . Offers refreshing nouveau voyeurism to readers who long ago burned out on American and English aspirational fantasies. . . . Hilarious.”
Janet Maslin, The New York Times
 
“It’s impossible not to get sucked into this satirical novel about the jet-setting lives of an enormous busybody family and its infinite Louboutin collection.”
Glamour
 
“There’s rich, there’s filthy rich, and then there’s crazy rich. . . . A Pride and Prejudice-like send-up.”
—People 
 
“If this isn’t the funniest book so far this year, it’s up there. . . . Kwan, who grew up in Singapore, skewers his subjects deftly, stylishly, and completely—but with heart.”
The Denver Post
 
“Deliciously decadent. . . . This 48-karat beach read is crazy fun. . . . [Read] Crazy Rich Asians, on an exotic beach in super-expensive sunglasses.”
Entertainment Weekly

“An unputdownably funny, original, modern novel. . . . I actually couldn't put this book down to eat or to watch Downton Abbey.”
—Plum Sykes, author of Bergdorf Blondes
 
“Rachel’s squeaky-clean naiveté is a clever foil to the intricate workings of the high-glamour Asian set around her. Chinese on the outside but all-American on the inside, she allows us to see the myriad nuances of intra-Asian culture that the novel goes to great lengths to show.”
—Tash Aw, NPR
 
“Rollicking. . . . A lively, generous story of shallow extravagance and human devotion.”
The Boston Globe
 
“Original and fun, Crazy Rich Asians is quite a roller coaster trip. I loved it!”
—Jackie Collins, author of The Power Trip
 
“Delightfully soapy. . . . [Crazy Rich Asians] eats its chiffon cake and has it too, simultaneously tut-tutting many of its characters for their vapid materialism while reveling in the milieu’s sybaritic excess.”
The Wall Street Journal
 
“As spicily adventurous and lusciously satisfying as the renowned Singaporean street food Kevin Kwan’s characters argue over; hot and sizzling, like the best satay, and dreamily transporting, like everyone's favorite dessert—goreng pisang. Feast on this outrageously funny and insightful novel of modern manners, and enjoy!”
—Lisa See, author of Dreams of Joy and Shanghai Girls
 
“[An] instant favorite. . . . Opulence and zaniness reign.”
O, The Oprah Magazine

“Like Dynasty on steroids with more private jets, bigger houses, and a lot more money.”
—VanityFair.com 
 
“Kevin Kwan gets it right in his debut novel steeped in love and dripping with money."
Daily Candy
 
“Both a deliciously satiric read and a Fodor’s of sorts to the world of Singapore’s fabulously moneyed, both new and old.”
The Daily News
 
“Jane Austen, or maybe Edith Wharton, goes to Singapore, turning in this lively, entertaining novel of manners.”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
 
“Mordantly funny. . . . [A] winning summer satire.”
—Vogue
 
“A juicy, close anthropological read of Singapore high society.”
Elle

“Shrewd, funny, sexy. . . . At once a love story and a potent combination of vintage Jackie Collins and early Evelyn Waugh.”
—Michael Korda, author of Charmed Lives

“A witty tongue-in-cheek frolic about what it means to be from really old money and what it's like to be crazy rich.”
Publishers Weekly, Pick of the Week



Conversation Starters from ReadingGroupChoices.com

  1. Compare how Nick’s mother (p. 21–28, p. 56) and Rachel’s mother (p. 31–34, p. 68) react to hearing about their trip to Singapore. What do their reactions reveal about each of them as mothers? What qualities, if any, do they share? What is the significance of the “Chinese Way” (p. 68) in the mothers’ approach to courtship and marriage? Compare this with Rachel and Sophie’s conversation about marriage later in the book (pp. 278–79).generic viagra price canada
  2. Does Nick’s description—“It’s like any big family. I have loudmouthed uncles, eccentric aunts, obnoxious cousins, the whole nine yards” (p. 67)—match the way most of us view our own families? Why doesn’t he tell Rachel more about the background and status of his family before their trip?generic viagra price canada
  3. What does Rachel’s view of Asian men reveal about the complications of growing up Asian in America (p. 90)? How does Kwan use humor to make a serious point here and in other parts of the novel?generic viagra price canada
  4. Discuss the role of gossip in the novel. What kinds of rumors do Nick’s friends and family spread about Rachel, and why?How do misunderstandings and misinformation (intentional or not) propel the plot and help define the characters? Consider, for example, the conversations at the Bible study class Eleanor attends (p. 108–109) and the chatter of the guests at Araminta’s bachelorette party (pp. 262–70).generic viagra price canada
  5. Do you see the events surround Colin’s wedding and the ceremony itself as brazen, even crude displays of wealth or are there aspects of the celebrations that are appealing (pp. 393–416)? How do they compare to society or celebrity weddings you have read about?generic viagra price canada
  6. What sort of future do you imagine for Nick and Rachel? Is it possible for Rachel to fit into a world “so different from anything [she’s] used to” (p. 431)?Does Nick fully understand the reasons for her doubts and unhappiness? What supports your point of view?generic viagra price canada
  7. Why does the author devote different sections of the novel to specific characters? What effect does this have on your impressions of and sympathies for the problems and prejudices that motivate each of them?generic viagra price canada
  8. What do the marriages of Eleanor and Philip, Astrid and Michael, and Eddie and Fiona show about what makes a marriage work and what can undermine even the best-intentioned husbands and wives?generic viagra price canada
  9. F. Scott Fitzgerald famously said, "The rich are different from you and me." In what ways are the characters in Crazy Rich Asians different from you and the people you know? Do they reflect the values of the particular communities Kwan explores or do they represent the ways of rich people everywhere? How do the divisions between economic and social status manifest themselves in American society?generic viagra price canada
  10. The novel makes a clear distinction between old money (the Youngs and their extended family) and new money (Peik Lin’s family, for example), as well as between Mainland and Overseas Chinese. What differences do you see between these groups and the way they deal with their wealth?How does this shape their perceptions of themselves and one another?generic viagra price canada
  11. Crazy Rich Asians is a story of the extremes of conspicuous wealth and consumption. Which scenes and settings in the novel best capture this excess?What do the many references to well-known luxury brands and exotic, expensive settings contribute to your sense of the time, place, and worldview of the characters?generic viagra price canada
  12. Nick’s family has enjoyed wealth and privilege over several generations. Discuss the impact of their position on each generation, from the imperious Eleanor to the status-consumed Eddie to Astrid, the It girl of Asian society, to Nick. Despite their very different approaches to life, what rules or traditions influence their behavior and interactions? What elements from his past does Nick retain, despite his new life in America?generic viagra price canada
  13. What role does the legacy of European imperialism play in the older generation’s tastes and style? How is the younger generation affected by their travels abroad and exposure to modern-day Western society? What insights does Rachel and Nick’s conversation with Su Yi give into the melding and clashing of European and Chinese cultures over the course of time (pp. 335–38)?generic viagra price canada
  14. In addition to straightforward explanations of Chinese words, what function do the footnotes serve? In what ways do they help the author to fill out the narrative or comment on the context and content of his story?Look, for instance, at the notes on pages 141, 180, 219, and 263.generic viagra price canada
  15. Behind its satirical tone and intent, what does the novel suggest about the ethical and emotional implications of the behavior that the characters indulge in?Does it make you think about some of your own actions or decisions?generic viagra price canada
  16. What did you know about the financial boom in contemporary Asia before you read the novel? Were you surprised by manifestations of wealth depicted in the book? Peik Lin’s father says, “[T]his so-called ‘prosperity’ is going to be the downfall of Asia. Each new generation becomes lazier than the next.... Nothing lasts forever, and when this boom ends, these youngsters won’t know what hit them” (p. 303).To what extent are his insights accurate, not only in regard to the situation in Asia today but also to economic patterns across history?generic viagra price canada
  17. Kevin Kwan has said that his novel follows an age-old literary tradition (Wall Street Journal, July 11, 2013).He points to Jane Austen writing about the “manor-house set,” Edith Wharton’s tales of America’s gilded age at the turn of the century, and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s chronicles of New York in the roaring ’20s. If you have read these books—or other novels about the manners and mores of the past—discuss the echoes and parallels you find in Crazy Rich Asians.generic viagra price canada
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