Map of the Invisible World (Paperback)

By Tash Aw

Spiegel & Grau, 9780385527972, 317pp.

Publication Date: December 28, 2010

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Description

From the author of the internationally acclaimed The Harmony Silk Factory comes an enthralling novel that evokes an exotic yet turbulent place and time 1960s Indonesia during President Sukarno's drive to purge the country of its colonial past. A page-turning story, Map of the Invisible World follows the journeys of two brothers and an American woman who are indelibly marked by the past and swept up in the tides of history.


About the Author

Tash Aw's debut novel, The Harmony Silk Factory, was the winner of the Whitbread First Novel Award and the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best First Novel and was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Malaysian by birth, he now lives in London. From the Hardcover edition.


Praise For Map of the Invisible World

“Reminiscent of Graham Greene . . . powerful and mesmerizing . . . haunting and memorable.”—The Guardian (U.K.)

“Full of immense intelligence and empathy.”—Time

“Beautifully written . . . The tension of the lives of Aw’s characters, the frayed fabric of Jakarta . . . the dichotomies of beauty and squalor, the mobs, the menace, the impending crisis—all of this is captured in Map of the Invisible World with a fidelity that can’t be faulted.”—The Washington Post

“Exquisite . . . What makes [Map of the Invisible World] brilliant are its rootless main characters. These fully formed individuals and their relationships transform [this] novel into a moving meditation on identity, memory, and art.”—Time Out New York
 

“Exquisitely and subtly rendered . . . Aw’s haunting writing and his detailed evocation of 1960s Indonesia are both masterly.”—The Christian Science Monitor

“[A] vibrant narrative . . . enveloping the reader in several haunting personal journeys.”—The Denver Post
 
“Engrossing . . . plunges the reader into another time and place, and both are alluring.”—The Plain Dealer
 
“Well-paced and gorgeously written, this epic story of loss and identity mirrors the struggles of the young Indonesia in which it takes place.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)

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