The Zookeeper's Wife (Paperback)

A War Story

By Diane Ackerman

W. W. Norton & Company, 9780393333060, 384pp.

Publication Date: September 17, 2008

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (2/7/2017)
Paperback, Large Print (9/1/2008)
Hardcover (9/17/2007)
Compact Disc (7/1/2008)
Compact Disc (1/1/2007)
MP3 CD (10/27/2016)
Hardcover, Large Print, Large Print (1/1/2008)
Pre-Recorded Audio Player (1/1/2008)

List Price: 15.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

The New York Times bestseller now a major motion picture starring Jessica Chastain.



A true story in which the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo saved hundreds of people from Nazi hands.


After their zoo was bombed, Polish zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski managed to save over three hundred people from the Nazis by hiding refugees in the empty animal cages. With animal names for these "guests," and human names for the animals, it's no wonder that the zoo's code name became "The House Under a Crazy Star." Best-selling naturalist and acclaimed storyteller Diane Ackerman combines extensive research and an exuberant writing style to re-create this fascinating, true-life story—sharing Antonina's life as "the zookeeper's wife," while examining the disturbing obsessions at the core of Nazism. Winner of the 2008 Orion Award.


About the Author

Diane Ackerman has been the finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction in addition to many other awards and recognitions for her work, which include the best-selling The Zookeeper's Wife and A Natural History of the Senses. She lives in Ithaca, New York.


Praise For The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story

It is no stretch to say that this is the book Ackerman was meant to write.

Diane Ackerman has surpassed even herself in her latest book, which is alternatingly funny, moving, and terrifying. This powerful thriller would be a great novel--except that it is true.
— Jared Diamond


Conversation Starters from ReadingGroupChoices.com

  1. How does Diane Ackerman's background as a naturalist and a poet inform her telling of this slice of history? Would a historian of World War II have told it differently, and, if so, what might have been left out?
  2. Reviews have compared this book to Schindler's List and Hotel Rwanda. How would you compare them?
  3. Did this book give you a different impression of Poland during World War II than you had before?
  4. Can you imagine yourself in the same circumstances as Jan and Antonina? What would you have done?
  5. How would you describe Antonina's relation to animals? To her husband? How does she navigate the various relationships in the book, given the extreme circumstances? Is her default position one of trust or distrust?
  6. Do people have a "sixth sense" and how does it relate to "animal instinct"?
  7. Some might judge Jan and Antonina guilty of anthropomorphizing animals and nature. Would you? Why or why not?
  8. Can nature be savage or kind–or can only humans embody those qualities? As science and the study of animal behavior and communication teach us more and more about the commonalities between animals and humans, is there still any dividing line between the human and the animal world? If so, how would you describe it?
  9. The Nazis had a passion for animals and the natural world. How could Nazi ideology embrace both a love of nature and the mass murder of human beings?
  10. The drive to "rewrite the genetic code of the entire planet" is not distinct to Nazism. What similar efforts are alive today? Are there lessons in Jan and Antonina's story for evaluating the benefits and dangers of trying to modify or improve upon nature? Do you see any connection between this story of more than sixty years ago and contemporary environmental issues?
  11. Genetic engineering of foodstuffs is highly contentious. So are various reproductive technologies that are now common, such as selecting for–or against–various characteristics when choosing from sperm or egg banks. How would various characters in this book have approached these loaded issues?