The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern (Cat Who... #2) (Mass Market)

By Lilian Jackson Braun

Berkley, 9780515087123, 256pp.

Publication Date: October 1, 1986

List Price: 7.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Jim Qwilleran and his cat Koko get a taste of trouble in the second mystery in the bestselling Cat Who series.

Jim Qwilleran isn’t exactly overwhelmed by his new assignment for the Daily Fluxion. Interior design has never been one of his specialties and now he’s supposed to turn out an entire magazine on the subject every week! But the first issue of Gracious Abodes is barely off the presses when Qwilleran finds himself back on more familiar territory—the exclusive residence featured on the cover has been burglarized and the lady of the house found dead.

Now Qwilleran and his brilliant Siamese cat, Koko, have their respective moustache and whiskers twitching. And when Koko starts pawing clues in the dictionary and sniffing designer furniture, Qwilleran finds himself doing a feature on a very clever murder...


About the Author

The history of Lilian Jackson Braun is perhaps as exciting and mysterious as her novels. Between 1966 and 1968, she published three novels to critical acclaim: The Cat Who Could Read Backwards, The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern, and The Cat Who Turned On and Off.  In 1966, the New York Times labeled Braun, “the new detective of the year.” Then, for reasons unknown, the rising mystery author disappeared from the publishing scene. It wasn’t until 1986 that Berkley Publishing Group reintroduced Braun to the public with the publication of an original paperback, The Cat Who Saw Red. Within two years, Berkley released four new novels in paperback and reprinted the three mysteries from the sixties. Since then, G.P. Putnam’s Sons has published seventeen additional novels in the Cat Who series. Braun passed away in 2011.


Praise For The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern (Cat Who... #2)

Praise for Lilian Jackson Braun and the Cat Who series

“A master of mystery.”—People

“Upbeat prose and amiable characters.”—Publishers Weekly

“The mix of crime and cats [is] catnip to readers who like both.”—Chicago Sun-Times

“Braun keeps both paws on the side of charming.”—Los Angeles Times