Representing Mass Violence (Paperback)

Conflicting Responses to Human Rights Violations in Darfur

By Joachim J. Savelsberg

University of California Press, 9780520281509, 362pp.

Publication Date: September 10, 2015

List Price: 34.95*
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Description

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s new open access publishing program for monographs. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more.

How do interventions by the UN Security Council and the International Criminal Court influence representations of mass violence? What images arise instead from the humanitarianism and diplomacy fields? How are these competing perspectives communicated to the public via mass media? Zooming in on the case of Darfur, Joachim J. Savelsberg analyzes more than three thousand news reports and opinion pieces and interviews leading newspaper correspondents, NGO experts, and foreign ministry officials from eight countries to show the dramatic differences in the framing of mass violence around the world and across social fields. Representing Mass Violence contributes to our understanding of how the world acknowledges and responds to violence in the Global South.


About the Author

Joachim J. Savelsberg is Professor of Sociology and Law and Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair at the University of Minnesota. He is the coauthor of American Memories: Atrocities and the Law and author of Crime and Human Rights: Criminology of Genocide and Atrocities.
 


Praise For Representing Mass Violence: Conflicting Responses to Human Rights Violations in Darfur

"A well-written and thoroughly researched project . . . Savelsberg’s book makes a significant contribution to criminology, global sociology, and the study of collective memory. . . . compelling and interesting."


"A very thoughtfully conceptualised and written work… a high level of theoretical and empirical craft."


"Focusing on the case of Darfur, Savelsberg analyzes more than 3,000 news reports and opinion pieces and interviews leading newspaper correspondents, NGO experts, and foreign ministry officials from eight countries to show the dramatic differences in the framing of mass violence around the world and across social fields. He considers such questions as: How do interventions by the UN Security Council and the International Criminal Court influence representations of mass violence? What images arise instead from the humanitarianism and diplomacy fields? How are these competing perspectives communicated to the public via mass media?"


"Overall, this solid research exhibits the systematic approach of a well-trained social scientist and will appeal not only to human rights scholars but also those considering the efficacy of international legal institutions as well as the role of the media, diplomacy and humanitarian organizations."


"This book is an exemplary, nuanced demonstration of why representations of human rights violations are important and how mass atrocities are framed or “socially constructed”—indeed, the word “representations” does an enormous amount of work in this book... Overall, this is an important study that makes concrete complex con- structions and representations of mass violence."