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Why Busing Failed

Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation (American Crossroads #42)

Matthew F. Delmont

Paperback

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Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (3/1/2016)

Description

In the decades after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, busing to achieve school desegregation became one of the nation’s most controversial civil rights issues. Why Busing Failed is the first book to examine the pitched battles over busing on a national scale, focusing on cities such as Boston, Chicago, New York, and Pontiac, Michigan. This groundbreaking book shows how school officials, politicians, the courts, and the media gave precedence to the desires of white parents who opposed school desegregation over the civil rights of black students.
 
This broad and incisive history of busing features a cast of characters that includes national political figures such as then-president Richard Nixon, Chicago mayor Richard J. Daley, and antibusing advocate Louise Day Hicks, as well as some lesser-known activists on both sides of the issue—Boston civil rights leaders Ruth Batson and Ellen Jackson, who opposed segregated schools, and Pontiac housewife and antibusing activist Irene McCabe, black conservative Clay Smothers, and Florida governor Claude Kirk, all supporters of school segregation. Why Busing Failed shows how antibusing parents and politicians ultimately succeeded in preventing full public school desegregation.


Praise For Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation (American Crossroads #42)

"By looking at the antibusing uprisings that were presented in mainstream media, this recommended narrative presents civil rights through the lens of media studies and offers an entirely new way of seeing how recent history was written."
— Library Journal

"Meticulous and insightful. . . . Delmont’s critique is tough but fair."
— The Boston Globe

"Why Busing Failed is an ambitious and well-researched account of an important aspect of the struggle for racial and educational equality in the United States."
— Pacific Historical Review

University of California Press, 9780520284258, 304pp.

Publication Date: March 1, 2016



About the Author

Matthew F.Delmont is Professor of History at Arizona State University and author of The Nicest Kids in Town: American Bandstand, Rock ‘n’ Roll, and the Struggle for Civil Rights in 1950s Philadelphia.