Masculine Compromise (Paperback)

Migration, Family, and Gender in China

By Susanne Yuk-Ping Choi, Yinni Peng

University of California Press, 9780520288287, 200pp.

Publication Date: February 9, 2016

Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (2/9/2016)

List Price: 29.95*
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Description

Drawing on the life stories of 266 migrants in South China, Choi and Peng examine the effect of mass rural-to-urban migration on family and gender relationships, with a specific focus on changes in men and masculinities. They show how migration has forced migrant men to renegotiate their roles as lovers, husbands, fathers, and sons. They also reveal how migrant men make masculine compromises: they strive to preserve the gender boundary and their symbolic dominance within the family by making concessions on marital power and domestic division of labor, and by redefining filial piety and fatherhood. The stories of these migrant men and their families reveal another side to China’s sweeping economic reform, modernization, and grand social transformations.


About the Author

Susanne Y. P. Choi is Professor of Sociology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Yinni Peng is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the Hong Kong Baptist University.


Praise For Masculine Compromise: Migration, Family, and Gender in China

"Impressive and innovative.. The book deftly presents theories, empirically rich, and also rather comprehensible to readers. I would strongly recommend it to scholars who engage in gender and migration studies in China and beyond, as well as anyone who is interested in migration, family and gender issues."

— New Books Asia

"Masculine Compromise makes a prominent contribution to the existing literature of men and rural–urban migration in China, with a primary focus on the migrant men’s family lives and personal relationships. . . . The book captures the power of patriarchy and the notion of masculine ideals through unfolding the patrilineal and patrilocal practices in the migrant men’s everyday lives."

— Sociology