Stick Together and Come Back Home (Paperback)

Racial Sorting and the Spillover of Carceral Identity

By Patrick Lopez-Aguado

University of California Press, 9780520288591, 240pp.

Publication Date: January 19, 2018

Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (1/19/2018)

List Price: 29.95*
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Description

In Stick Together and Come Back Home, Patrick Lopez-Aguado examines how what happens inside a prison affects what happens outside of it. Following the experiences of seventy youth and adults as they navigate juvenile justice and penal facilities before finally going back home, he outlines how institutional authorities structure a “carceral social order” that racially and geographically divides criminalized populations into gang-associated affiliations. These affiliations come to shape one’s exposure to both violence and criminal labeling, and as they spill over the institutional walls they establish how these unfold in high-incarceration neighborhoods as well, revealing the insidious set of consequences that mass incarceration holds for poor communities of color.


About the Author

Patrick Lopez-Aguado is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Santa Clara University.


Praise For Stick Together and Come Back Home: Racial Sorting and the Spillover of Carceral Identity

“An in-depth, detailed example of the ways in which the criminal justice system replicates the racist inclinations of the larger society.”

— CHOICE

"Stick Together and Come Back Home is a compassionate look at criminalized youth and adults. . . . This book is likely to be of interest to students and scholars of juvenile justice, incarceration, race, and gangs. It should also be of interest to policymakers and practitioners . . . who may be individually well-intentioned but embedded in larger and destructive systems."

— Social Forces

"Stick Together and Come Back Home is a valuable contribution to the field for its examination of the interplay between state and street violence on both cultural and structural levels. ... In shifting the focus from gang conflict itself to a deconstruction of how institutions systematically organize youth around gang conflict, Lopez-Aguado illuminates how law enforcement simultaneously structures and deploys intergroup violence as evidence of the need for criminal justice targeting."

— American Journal of Sociology