The Nazis Next Door (Paperback)

How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler’s Men

By Eric Lichtblau

Mariner Books, 9780544577886, 304pp.

Publication Date: October 6, 2015

Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (10/28/2014)
MP3 CD (10/6/2015)
Compact Disc (10/6/2015)
Compact Disc (10/28/2014)
MP3 CD (10/28/2014)
Compact Disc (10/28/2014)

List Price: 15.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

"A captivating book rooted in first-rate research." — New York Times Book Review

New York Times 
bestseller — Espionage category


For the first time, once-secret government records and interviews tell the full story of the thousands of Nazis—from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich—who came to the United States after World War II and quietly settled into new lives. Many gained entry on their own as self-styled war “refugees.” But some had help from the U.S. government. The CIA, the FBI, and the military all put Hitler’s minions to work as spies, intelligence assets, and leading scientists and engineers, whitewashing their histories. Only years after their arrival did private sleuths and government prosecutors begin trying to identify the hidden Nazis. Now, relying on a trove of newly disclosed documents and scores of interviews, Eric Lichtblau reveals this shocking, shameful, and little-known chapter of postwar history.
 
“Disturbing.” — Salon    

“Engaging.” — Chicago Tribune

“A gripping chronicle.” — Times of Israel

“Riveting . . . An important, fascinating read.” — Jewish Book Council



About the Author

ERIC LICHTBLAU is a Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative reporter in the Washington bureau of the New York Times and has written about legal, political, and national security issues in the capital since 1999. He was the co-recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in 2006 for his stories in the New York Times disclosing the existence of a secret wiretapping program approved by President George W. Bush after the 9/11 attacks. He was a reporter for the Los Angeles Times for fifteen years before joining the New York Times in 2002. A graduate of Cornell University, he is the author of Bushs Law: The Remaking of American Justice, which one reviewer called “All the President’s Men for an Age of Terror.” In the course of research for The Nazis Next Door, he was a visiting fellow at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC. He lives outside Washington with his wife and children.