Reptilia (Paperback)

By Hanna Tawater

Ayahuasca Publishing, 9780692065303, 108pp.

Publication Date: September 18, 2018

List Price: 14.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Reptilia is an exploration of the dark erotic feminine through the lens of myth, quantum physics, and the colonial nature of semiotics. With bold approaches that seek to unravel the nature of patriarchal realities, Hanna Tawater's poetry captures the fury of modern female rage encased in the unblinking demeanor of the serpent. The text echoes across time, space, thought, and phylum, and transports the reader to a place where you will always find the apex to be cold-blooded.

Chelsea Hodson, author of Tonight I'm Someone Else, says, "These are poems of transformation--birds become reptiles, snakes become women, time becomes skin, the Ouroboros becomes itself. 'Between the idea / and reality / you were my favorite moment, ' one of the poems reads, and, with this, the changes themselves become journeys worthy of our attention. Reptilia is bold, smart, and engrossing."

Rios De La Luz, author of Itza, says, "Tawater's poetry is an eruption of lavish imagery and an undeniably erotic aura. Her poems feel mythological and ancient, like a new sensuous language mixing the scientific with the magic of the serpent."

Janice Lee, author of The Sky Isn't Blue, says, "Hanna Tawater's Reptilia is a vibratory, phosphorescent text that understands how subtle differences in a physical or linguistic configuration might result in a new way of seeing, that is, where does monstrosity stem from, how is fear manifested, how is power created in the sorrow of a creature's eyes, the coldness of its blood, the still-beating serpent's heart when removed from its body to be consumed by another. How close and how far are we to each other. An uncanny, haunting, and singular work."

Juliet Escoria, author of Witch Hunt, says, "Reading Reptilia feels like slowly opening a Pandora's box of sorts, as though by doing you are unearthing something ancient and alluring and powerful and wicked. These are not poems but spells, and with them Hanna Tawater establishes herself as writer who demands not just to be read, but reckoned with."