Teach the Free Man (Paperback)

Stories

By Peter Nathaniel Malae, Peter Nathaniel Malae

Swallow Press, 9780804010993, 272pp.

Publication Date: March 15, 2007

Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (3/15/2007)

List Price: 18.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

The twelve stories in Teach the Free Man mark the impressive debut of Peter Nathaniel Malae. The subject of incarceration thematically links the stories, yet their range extends beyond the prison’s barbed wire and iron bars. Avoiding sensationalism, Malae exposes the heart and soul in those dark, seemingly inaccessible corridors of the human experience.

The stories, often raw and startlingly honest, are distinguished by the colloquial voices of California’s prison inmates, who, despite their physical and cultural isolation, confront dilemmas with which we can all identify: the choice to show courage against peer pressure; the search for individual rights within a bureaucracy; and the desperate desire for honor in the face of great sacrifice. These stories present polished and poetic examples of finding something redemptive in the least among us.

The book’s epigraph by W. H. Auden, from which the book takes its title, exemplifies the spirit of these dynamic stories:
In the deserts of the heart
Let the healing fountain start.
In the prison of his days
Teach the free man how to praise.



About the Author

Peter Nathaniel Malae lives in Santa Clara, CA, where he is a 2007-08 Steinbeck Fellow at San José State University. His fiction, poetry, and essays have appeared in Cimarron Review, Missouri Review, ZYZZYVA, and a host of other magazines and journals across the nation. His work has been selected for distinguished recognition in the Best American Essays and Best American Mysteries series. The manuscript of his first novel was recently awarded the Joseph Henry Jackson Literary Award by the San Francisco Foundation as well as a Silicon Valley Arts Council Fellowship.



Praise For Teach the Free Man: Stories

“Peter Malae is the real deal. He's like a young Nelson Algren or RichardWright, one of those writers who can hit with both hands. And his book ismore than an auspicious debut; it's as good a collection of stories as I'veread in years.”—Russell Banks


“Rather than physical descriptions of San Quentin and other penal landmarks, readers will find brilliant psychological portraits of convicts, ex-cons, their families and prison workers. The real prison, Malae suggests, is the ‘institutional me-tracked mind.’”—Metro Newspapers, Silicon Valley


“Inmates, their families, parolees, and prison workers are the subjects of this gritty, compelling collection that reveals a parallel world most readers are fortunate to have avoided encountering. It puts a human face on violence, hardship, and suffering in the name of justice, making them that much harder to ignore.”—The Story Prize


“Most of the characters in Peter Malae’s Teach the Free Man have managed to mismanage their lives, but what counts here is that Malae handles their voices so that their language—the slang, the jargon, the argot—rings true and draws us wholly into their hard luck, often violent, worlds. These are stories from borders of society and we need to thanks Mr. Malae for delivering them to us.”—Darrell Spencer, author of Bring Your Legs with You


“The characters in these stories may be marginalized, but the stories themselves are the work of a talented author who deserves a wide audience.... (A)s good fiction must, they broaden our understanding of what it is to be human.”—Rain Taxi