The Gift of Ramadan (Hardcover)

By Rabiah York Lumbard, Laura K. Horton (Illustrator)

Albert Whitman & Company, 9780807529065, 32pp.

Publication Date: April 1, 2019

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (3/1/2020)

List Price: 16.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Sophia wants to fast for Ramadan this year. She tries to keep busy throughout the day so she won’t think about food. But when the smell of cookies is too much, she breaks her fast early. How can she be part of the festivities now?


About the Author

Rabiah York Lumbard is an American Muslim author of several award-winning picture books including Angels, Everyone Prays, and Pine and the Winter Sparrow. Her debut YA novel, What They Hide, will be published by Random House in 2019. She currently lives in Qatar. Laura K. Horton is a freelance illustrator with a passion for family, creativity, and imagination. She earned her BFA in illustration and animation from the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. When not working, she enjoys drinking tea, reading, and game designing. Originally from Utah, Laura currently lives in Finland.


Praise For The Gift of Ramadan

"An appealing introduction." —Booklist


"An inquisitive young girl, Sophia, is excited about Ramadan, a holy month of fasting in Islam. As her grandmother and mother describe what Ramadan means, Sophia announces that she will fast. Throughout the day, she tries to keep herself busy and not think about food. However, her little brother starts to chase her with a cookie. As the smell of chocolate fills her nose, Sophia can’t resist her urges anymore and starts eating cookies. Distressed that she lost the sparkly feeling she was supposed to gain from fasting, she learns what is expected of different age groups and other ways people can earn blessings during this observance. This book makes Ramadan approachable to young audiences. The adorable illustrations of Sophia and the daily life of one family as they navigate their fasting are age appropriate and represent the story very well. The book has a small issue—the author oversimplifies the concepts of sunrise and sundown. Some terms, such as sahoor and iftar, could have been explained either in the text or in the glossary. VERDICT Highly recommended to introduce young readers to Islamic culture and traditions; a perfect addition to holiday book collections." —School Library Journal