The 11 Laws of Likability: Relationship Networking . . . Because People Do Business with People They Like (Paperback)

Relationship Networking . . . Because People Do Business with People They Like

By Michelle Tillis Lederman

Amacom, 9780814416372, 240pp.

Publication Date: September 15, 2011

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Description

We all know that networking is important, and that forming relationships with others is a vital part of success. But sometimes it seems like networking removes all emotions from the equation and focuses only on immediate goals...whereas the kind of relationships that have true staying power, give us joy, and support us in the long run are founded on simply liking each other. This book, featuring activities, self-assessment quizzes, and real-life anecdotes from professional and social settings, shows readers how to identify what's likable in themselves and create honest, authentic interactions that become "wins" for all parties involved. Readers will discover how to: - Start conversations and keep them going with ease - Convert acquaintances into friends - Uncover people's preferences and tweak their own personal style to enable engaging, reciprocal interactions - Create follow-up and stay in others' minds long after the initial meeting The worst thing we can do when trying to establish a personal bond with someone is to come across as manipulative or self-serving. Authentic connections go much deeper--and feel much easier--than trying to hit self-imposed business card collection quotas. This book presents a new paradigm that shows how even the most networking-averse can network...and like it.


About the Author

MICHELLE TILLIS LEDERMAN is founder and CEO of Executive Essentials, which provides customized communication and leadership programs. She is also an adjunct professor at NYU Stern School of Business and a faculty member of the American Management Association. She specializes in enhancing interpersonal communications and has delivered seminars internationally for corporations, universities, and nonprofit organizations including JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, Deutsche Bank, Columbia Business School, and The Museum of Modern Art.
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