Look Up! (Paperback)

By Jin-Ho Jung, Mi Hyun Kim (Translated by)

Holiday House, 9780823440139, 32pp.

Publication Date: January 23, 2018

Other Editions of This Title:
Hardcover (7/30/2016)

List Price: 7.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

A nearly wordless story about compassion, friendship, and perspective.

High on a balcony, a girl watches the world-- passersby hurrying along, carrying umbrellas in the rain, riding bikes and walking dogs.  She wishes that someone-- anyone!-- would look up and notice her.  Finally, one day, a boy does. Realizing she can't see anything but the tops of people's heads, he lays flat on the pavement. . . and then another person does. . . . and another. The girl smiles, and color begins to brighten her gray world-- as does her newfound friendship.

With spare, simple text and striking black-and-white illustrations depicting the girl's bird's-eye-view of the world, Look Up! is a striking, emotional story about the incredible impact of simple kindnesses and the unexpected joy of looking at the world a new way.

A Bank Street Best Children's Book of the Year


About the Author

Hospitalized as a child, Jung Jin-Ho found friendship and companionship in his books. Born in Daegu, Korea, he currently lives in Seoul.


Praise For Look Up!

* "The illustrations' style is loose and unfinished . . . nicely balancing the high concept. Conceptually sophisticated; especially inviting for young artists ready to explore new visual angles."—Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

"Often, deceptively simple picturebooks are the most profound.  Such is the case with Look Up!, which portrays a girl looking down from her balcony onto the sidewalk below, hoping someone will look up and acknowledge her. . . . Through visually striking illustrations and spare text, Look Up! offers a story of compassion and hope sure to inspire acts of kindness."—Language Arts Magazine

"Jung's spare, scratchy black-and-white drawings depict the simple scenes with little embellishment; the introduction of color at the very end, including a green sprout in a pot on the balcony, subtly signals the richness that comes when our daily lives intersect."—The Horn Book Magazine