Not So Wild a Dream (Paperback)

By Eric Sevareid, Eric Sevareid (Introduction by)

University of Missouri, 9780826210142, 544pp.

Publication Date: June 1, 1995

List Price: 29.95*
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Description

An account of a young journalist's experience during World War II. This book records the events of the war and the development of journalistic strategies for covering international affairs.


About the Author

Eric Sevareid (1912-1992) began his illustrious journalistic career at the age of nineteen as a copyboy. He moved steadily up the career ladder, becoming first a reporter for the Minneapolis Star, then city editor for the Paris edition of the New York Herald Tribune, before serving as the night editor for UPI in Paris. In 1939, he began his career with Columbia Broadcasting System as a European war correspondent. After the war, he continued working for CBS as a national correspondent and visited the homes of millions of Americans nightly until his retirement in 1977.


Praise For Not So Wild a Dream

"It is a classic American autobiography, superbly written, which evokes poignant memories of the American dream."--William Manchester



"For anyone even remotely interested in American literature and journalism, Not So Wild a Dream is a must-read, and a joy."--Dan Rather



It remains an important book with a new kind of timeliness. Not So Wild a Dream can stand on its own as an intelligent, eloquent accounting of a generation that had to survive the Depression and World War II in order to reach maturity--and then took a long, deep breath because the worst simply had to be behind."--Time



"The book is an excellent sketch of the war's progress, and a thoughtful personal record of Mr. Sevareid's adventures--one of the most far ranging war correspondent journals yet published."-- Library Journal



"It was--and is--a beautifully written, idealistically inclined book that captured the youthful dreams of America and the postwar world. . . . What was once read as a personal story can now be seen as a part of our history."--New York Times