Notes on the Assemblage (Hardcover)

By Juan Felipe Herrera

City Lights Books, 9780872867109, 104pp.

Publication Date: September 22, 2015

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (9/15/2015)
MP3 CD (7/25/2017)

List Price: 19.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Juan Felipe Herrera, the first Latino Poet Laureate of the United States and son of Mexican immigrants, grew up in the migrant fields of California.

Appointed as the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2015, Juan Felipe Herrera is the son of migrant farm workers, and was educated at UCLA and Stanford University, and received his MFA from the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. His numerous poetry collections include "187 Reasons Mexicanos Can't Cross the Border: Undocuments 1971-2007," "Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems" (2008), and "Border-Crosser with a Lamborghini Dream" (1999). In addition to publishing more than a dozen collections of poetry, Herrera has written short stories, young adult novels, and children's literature.

In 2012, Herrera was named California's poet laureate. He has won the Hungry Mind Award of Distinction, the Focal Award, two Latino Hall of Fame Poetry Awards, and a PEN West Poetry Award. His honors include the UC Berkeley Regent's Fellowship as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, and the Stanford Chicano Fellows. He has also received several grants from the California Arts Council.

Herrera is also a performance artist and activist on behalf of migrant and indigenous communities and at-risk youth. His creative work often crosses genres, including poetry opera and dance theater. His children's book, "The Upside Down Boy" (2000), was adapted into a musical. His books for children and young adults have won several awards, including "Calling the Doves" (2001), which won the Ezra Jack Keats Award, and "CrashBoomLove" (1999), a novel-in-verse for young adults which won the Americas Award. His book "Half The World in Light" was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle prize in 2009.

Praise for "Notes on the Assemblage"

"Juan Felipe Herrera's family has gone from migrant worker to poet laureate of the United States in one generation. One generation. I am an adamant objector to the Horatio Alger myth of pulling oneself up by the bootstraps, but Herrera's story is one of epic American proportions. The heads carved into my own Mount Rush"mas" would be Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, Frida Kahlo, El Chapulin Colorado, Selena, and Juan Felipe Herrera. "Notes from the Assemblage" further carves out Herrera's place in American letters."&mdashDavid Tomas Martinez, author of "Hustle"

"At home with field workers, wage slaves, the homeless, little children, old folks, artists, traditionalists, the avant-garde, students, scholars and prisoners, the bilingual Juan Felipe Herrera is the real thing: a populist treasure. He will fulfill his appointment as U.S. Poet Laureate with the same high energy, savvy, passion, compassion, commitment and playfulness that his art and life's have always embodied. Bravo Bravo "Al Young, California's former poet laureate

"I am proud that Juan Felipe Herrera has been appointed U.S. Poet Laureate, bringing his truthful, beautiful voice to all of us universally. As the first Chicano Laureate, he will empower all diverse cultures."Janice Mirikitani, San Francisco Poet Laureate, 2000

"Juan Felipe Herrera's appointment is a timely one, particularly as we enter an election year that's fraught with the usual anxiety and misinformation about immigration issues. Herrera is a beloved poet whose extensive body of work reminds us that the politicized world of the immigrant, and of the Mexican community within the United States in particular, also participate in shaping the rich cultural identity of American literature."Rigoberto Gonzalez, author of "Our Lady of the Crossword" and "Red-Inked Retablos"



About the Author

Appointed as the U.S. Poet Laureate in 2015, Juan Felipe Herrera is the son of migrant farm workers, and was educated at UCLA and Stanford University, and received his MFA from the University of Iowa Writers Workshop. His numerous poetry collections include 187 Reasons Mexicanos Can t Cross the Border: Undocuments 1971-2007, Half of the World in Light: New and Selected Poems (2008), and Border-Crosser with a Lamborghini Dream (1999). In addition to publishing more than a dozen collections of poetry, Herrera has written short stories, young adult novels, and children s literature.

In 2012, Herrera was named California's poet laureate. He has won the Hungry Mind Award of Distinction, the Focal Award, two Latino Hall of Fame Poetry Awards, and a PEN West Poetry Award. His honors include the UC Berkeley Regent s Fellowship as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, and the Stanford Chicano Fellows. He has also received several grants from the California Arts Council.

Herrera is also a performance artist and activist on behalf of migrant and indigenous communities and at-risk youth. His creative work often crosses genres, including poetry opera and dance theater. His children s book, The Upside Down Boy (2000), was adapted into a musical. His books for children and young adults have won several awards, including Calling the Doves (2001), which won the Ezra Jack Keats Award, and Crashbomlove (1999), a novel-in-verse for young adults which won the Americas Award. His book Half The World in Light is a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle prize in 2009."