Bringing Nature Home (Paperback)

How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants, Updated and Expanded

By Douglas W. Tallamy, Rick Darke (Contributions by)

Timber Press, 9780881929928, 360pp.

Publication Date: April 1, 2009

List Price: 19.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

“If you cut down the goldenrod, the wild black cherry, the milkweed and other natives, you eliminate the larvae, and starve the birds. This simple revelation about the food web—and it is an intricate web, not a chain—is the driving force in Bringing Nature Home.” —The New York Times

As development and subsequent habitat destruction accelerate, there are increasing pressures on wildlife populations. But there is an important and simple step toward reversing this alarming trend: Everyone with access to a patch of earth can make a significant contribution toward sustaining biodiversity. There is an unbreakable link between native plant species and native wildlife—native insects cannot, or will not, eat alien plants. When native plants disappear, the insects disappear, impoverishing the food source for birds and other animals. In many parts of the world, habitat destruction has been so extensive that local wildlife is in crisis and may be headed toward extinction.

Bringing Nature Home has sparked a national conversation about the link between healthy local ecosystems and human well-being, and the new paperback edition—with an expanded resource section and updated photos—will help broaden the movement. By acting on Douglas Tallamy's practical recommendations, everyone can make a difference.


About the Author

Douglas W. Tallamy is a professor of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware. He has been awared a silver medal by the Garden Writers’ Association, the Garden Club of America Margaret Douglas Medal for Conservation, and the Tom Dodd, Jr. Award of Excellence. Tallamy is a regular columnist for Garden Design Magazine.



Rick Darke is a landscape design consultant, author, lecturer, and photographer based in Pennsylvania who blends art, ecology, and cultural geography in the creation and conservation of livable landscapes. His projects include scenic byways, public gardens, corporate and collegiate campuses, mixed-use conservation developments, and residential gardens. Darke served on the staff of Longwood Gardens for twenty years and received the Scientific Award of the American Horticultural Society. His work has been featured in the New York Times and on National Public Radio. Darke is recognized as one of the world's experts on grasses and their use in public and private landscapes. For further information visit www.rickdarke.com.



Praise For Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants, Updated and Expanded

“A fascinating study of the trees, shrubs, and vines that feed the insects, birds, and other animals in the suburban garden.” —The New York Times
 
“Provides the rationale behind the use of native plants, a concept that has rapidly been gaining momentum. . . . The text makes a case for native plants and animals in a compelling and complete fashion.” —The Washington Post

“This is the ‘it’ book in certain gardening circles. It’s really struck a nerve.” —Philadelphia Inquirer

“Reading this book will give you a new appreciation of the natural world—and how much wild creatures need gardens that mimic the disappearing wild.” —The Minneapolis Star Tribune
 
“A compelling argument for the use of native plants in gardens and landscapes.” —Landscape Architecture
 
“An essential guide for anyone interested in increasing biodiversity in the garden.” —American Gardener

“I want to mention how excited I am about reading Bringing Nature Home. . . . I like the writing—enthusiastic and down-to-earth, as it should be.” —Garden Rant

“An informative and engaging account of the ecological interactions between plants and wildlife, this fascinating handbook explains why exotic plants can hinder and confuse native creatures, from birds and bees to larger fauna.” —Seattle Post-Intelligencer
 
“Tallamy explains eloquently how native plant species depend on native wildlife.” —San Luis Obispo Tribune
 
“Will persuade all of us to take a look at what is in our own yards with an eye to how we, too, can make a difference. It has already changed me.” —Traverse City Record-Eagle
 
“Delivers an important message for all gardeners: Choosing native plants fortifies birds and other wildlife and protects them from extinction.” —WildBird Magazine