The Inquisitor (Hardcover)

By Jerome Gold

Black Heron Press, 9780930773137, 290pp.

Publication Date: January 1, 2010

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (1/1/1991)

List Price: 19.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

The Inquisitor is a taut, muscled novel which reveals, with painful honesty, the search for male identity, native Indian identity, and American identity. It shows us ourselves, and the mirror is not flattering. It exposes the process of moral corruption in bureaucracies and individuals. It tears the veil off the American soul and exposes it in a harsh flurorescent glare, in the blue light of the TV screen. It is a atory of how we all, native Indians and other Americans, may be exiled from our deepest selves. We may well see our own darkest fears and fantasies in this novel.


About the Author

Jerome Gold is the author of thirteen books, including the fiction collection, The Moral Life of Soldiers, and Paranoia & Heartbreak, a memoir of the years he spent as a rehabilitation counselor in a prison for children. He lives in Seattle, Washington.


Praise For The Inquisitor

“. . . A taut, muscled novel which exposes, painfully and by degrees, the process of moral corruption–in bureaucratic organizations and in individuals whose lives are controlled by them . . . . This novel reveals many faces of alienation in contemporary America.” — Dr. Sue Ann Johnston, Western Washington University and Simon Fraser University (Adjunct)



“It is as if Kafka and Orwell have conspired to present us with a cautionary tale of an American future . . . with deceit behind every desk and death lurking near every file cabinet. At long last the great novel of bureaucracy has been written.” — David Willson, author of REMF Diary and The REMF Returns



“A horror novel in which the monsters are not just human beings but social forces, where blood is spilled . . . in freeze frame agonies of compassion.” — J.G. Eccarus, The Stake



“Gold . . . has a grip on many of the predicaments, characters, and tendencies which contemporary fiction is concerned with.” — The Small Press Book Review