Hammers (Hardcover)

By Ron Dakron

Black Heron Press, 9780930773489, 251pp.

Publication Date: June 15, 1998

List Price: 22.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

A young geneticist perfects a medical serum made from both human and shark DNA. In her hurry and ambition, she skips biotech protocol and tries the serum on herself. But a mistake has been made - instead of shooting u a fraction of shark DNA, she's popped the entire hammerhead genetic code. Oops. Hammers is a comic novel about people turning into sharks. Set in a modern biotech city, it follows five characters as they mutate and fight for dominance, sex, and a reliable source of fresh squid. Hammers is a classic transformation tale in the genre of Frankenstein.


About the Author

Ron Dakron is the author of four novels--infra, Newt, Hammers, and Mantids--. His work runs the gamut from surrealism to sci-fi pastiche. Point No Point tagged his novels as a cross between jive bullshit, hip-hop Henny Youngman, and full-tilt Rimbaudian street-smartass sublimity. Raven Chronicles judged him as sinister as a thirteen-year-old with a lighter and a keg of butane. Publishers Weekly deemed him a writer with a fine ear and plenty of gusto.


Praise For Hammers

“Dakron keeps the story moving along at a sprightly (not to say manic) clip . . . readers of his third novel (after infra and Newt) will discover a writer with a fine ear and plenty of gusto.””I was sucked into Ron Dakron’s prose and the world he created. I read the rest of the book in one sitting because he had created a world I found interesting . . . This is clearly a book better than the sum of it’s parts. I do recommend that you check it out and … let yourself get sucked into the tale Dakron is weaving.” — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1997



“Ne plus ultra bizarre, man! With cartilaginous prose, soft as fishbone, sense-bending and scattershot as a Robin Williams shtick where lost meanings blast by, Dakron’s third [novel] follows the comet trails of Infra and Newt with a morphological plot out of Ovid by way of Kafka.” — KIRKUS REVIEWS, AUGUST 15, 1997



“Here’s Mr. Dakron’s fine recent book of fiction, alive and scathing and funny and sexy . . . It’s a cross between jive bullshit, hip-hop Henny Youngman, and full-tilt Rimbaudian street-smartass sublimity . . . If you like relentless, lightning-fast, oh-so-witty prose, you’ll like the book.” — POINT NO POINT, SPRING/SUMMER 1998



“Hammers with its unraveling sentences and unthreaded DNA helix is…an anti-novel in the tradition of Lawrence Stern, William Burroughs, and John Barth. According to Ron Dakron, language isn’t a virus so much as bit rot…Hammers is a series of images generated by flipping the TV channel, a peanut brickel of cultural garbage, a parody of our current state of information disease; this is a black parable involving an incestuous threesome, mass consumption of fish burgers, and the corruption of DNA…Ron Dakron infuses the novel with a warped energy. The language of the book doesn’t feel like a deliberate construction but rather as a literal transcription of the narrator’s hybrid brain. It’s a novel as Tourette’s Syndrome. Hammers is a corrupt piece of information, as sinister as a thirteen year old with a lighter and a keg of butane.” — MATT BRIGGS, RAVEN CHRONICLES, APRIL 1998