The Joy of Nursing Reclaiming Our Nobility (Hardcover)

By Juliana Adams

Steamboat Springs Publishing, 9780997200324, 256pp.

Publication Date: May 1, 2016

List Price: 25.00*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

You know when you've had a great nurse ... you can feel it!

Juliana Adams has lived her dream of being a nurse for 50 years. Her stories are stunning and startling; raw and revealing; heart wrenching and heart soaring. In her eye-opening experiences, she provides a deeper perspective ... to always look beyond the diagnosis ... because every nurse is more than just a nurse! 

The Joy of Nursing: Reclaiming Our Nobility is provocative and riveting as the stories from new nurse to intuitive experienced nurse unfold. Far more than a memoir it is a rich journey from novice to expert, a concept with historical roots for all who enter this profession. 

-Are you a nurse or exploring nursing as a career? 

-Are you wondering what is true about being a nurse? 

-Does your nursing reality match the dream you once envisioned? 

For the currently practicing nurse, The Joy of Nursing will resonate with you. What Juliana learned about herself and her profession created a foundation of practicing nursing that resulted in a far deeper sense of joy. 

The Joy of Nursing will give you hope.

For those who feel the call to become a nurse, you will see yourself in Juliana's innocence and desire to be the best nurse possible. This is a beautiful place to begin your life as a nurse ... and to carry with you throughout your career. Nurses have the knowledge, tenacity and creativity to ensure that the continued sacredness of the nurse-patient relationship endures. 

The Joy of Nursing will inspire you to live your nursing dream. 

With courage, insight and optimism, Juliana Adams reveals the challenges and barriers that face the profession. To be a nurse is an honor. 

She shares stories, her insights, and her dedication to nursing are exactly what the overwhelmed, disillusioned, innocent and anyone entering nursing need. 

Within The Joy of Nursing: Reclaiming Our Nobility, you will learn: 

If you are a practicing nurse, you will rejoice and rediscover your joy of and in nursing.

If you feel the call to be a nurse, you will be encouraged to become part of this exciting profession.

If you are disenchanted, you will uncover novel approaches for feeling valued and reconnected to the organization.

If you know someone in nursing, you will celebrate their dedication to the patients and families they care for. 

Get ready to rekindle the nursing spirit that is the essence of healing care for both patient and self. Discover Juliana Adams Camelot Nursing!



About the Author

Juliana Adams, BSN, MSN, MA is dedicated to the advancement of the nursing profession and is actively engaged in how nursing care is delivered. She is an author, speaker and film maker.

In 2012 she produced the film Exposure, Reclaiming the Nobility of Nursing. This film led her to seek a greater understanding of the concept of nobility within nursing. What began as a metaphor of her own exposure to life and nursing, led her to write The Joy of Nursing: Reclaiming Our Nobility. 

Juliana has experienced many diverse environments; having worked in ICU’s, ER’s, Ambulatory Care, research, nursing leadership and as an entrepreneur. All contributed to her global perspective of nursing. She is an English as a Second Language (ESL) instructor who marvels at how her students, similar to the many patients she has cared for, enrich her life. 

Juliana personally believes that if everyone supported one person that needed assistance, it would result in having individual and societal needs met on a level that would far exceed our expectations. The gift of one’s self sows the seeds for all of humanity to heal.



Praise For The Joy of Nursing Reclaiming Our Nobility

This memoir of life in the emergency room takes an uplifting view of nursing as a profession—one which carries its own distinctive light.

The Joy of Nursing: Reclaiming Our Nobility is a candid, moving career memoir by Juliana Adams that examines her fifty years as an RN. Framed by reflections on Florence Nightingale and the nursing industry, the heart of the book lies in a Denver hospital ER, where humanity meets in visceral, sometimes humorous, often bewildering moments, all of which are met with admirable strength. An impassioned view of the healing arts examines the patient-nurse exchange as one that involves advocacy, care, and most essentially, love.

Adams’s account follows her path from wide-eyed idealism as a novice in the ICU to wisdom earned through the rigors of working at Denver General. A place where patients include the underprivileged, the destitute, and those whose injuries inspire reflection on the violence people inflict on each other, the setting is brought to life through accounts of staff members pulling together. Rather than inuring the author, witnessing trauma reminds her of the call to remain fully present. Even the treatment of perpetrators, such as drunk drivers, allows for lessons in avoiding judgment.

The ability to search for good in an urban ER lets the work rise above conversations that focus on a community’s socioeconomic ills. Everyone is equalized by the reality that illness and injury can, and will, eventually befall everyone; it is this sense of connectivity and empathy that drives the book’s message. Less dramatic but equally thoughtful scenes depict the staff’s efforts to build a clothing boutique for patients who arrive in need—an unusual, necessary topic that outsiders may not consider.

Especially searing moments include descriptions of a battered woman who begins to miscarry in the waiting room, the death of a feverish child, and a night on which several victims of sexual assault appear. Incidents are thoughtfully recounted, emphasizing the ways in which nursing demands resolve to allow others as much dignity as possible in their vulnerable moments, and to participate, if only briefly, in unthinkable struggles.

A few intriguing threads, including time spent nursing in Germany, are mentioned in passing, though they could broaden the topic by serving as contrasts to the Denver ER. The concluding section turns away from personal recollections toward the increasing bureaucracy in hospitals. An encouraging voice provides suggestions for nurses who feel burdened to guide them back to the original passion that lead them to their profession. Prose remains sharp throughout.

The Joy of Nursing: Reclaiming Our Nobility takes an uplifting view of a calling that was once regarded as a lesser role in medicine, proving that it is every bit as critical. Nurses become more than intermediaries between doctors, patients, and families; they carry their own distinctive light.

- Karen Rigby - FOREWARD Reviews

Exceptionally well written, organized and presented, "The Joy of Nursing: Reclaiming Our Nobility" is particularly commended to the attention of anyone who is a nurse or exploring nursing as a career; who is wondering what is true about being a nurse; and is questioning whether their nursing reality matches the dream of nursing that they once envisioned. While very highly recommended for community, nursing school, and academic library Health/Medicine collections, it should be noted for personal reading lists that "The Joy of Nursing: Reclaiming Our Nobility" is also available in a paperback edition

- - Midwest Book Reviews

Nursing is not an easy job – there is heartbreak, stress, and backbreaking work involved. THE JOY OF NURSING illustrates all that, but with an undertone of hope, pride, and strength.

To have a career that spans 50 years is impressing and daunting in itself, never mind having to deal with human suffering for all that time. Imagine the innovations that one would see, watching the field grow and develop! Adams starts with the beginning of nursing, as created by Florence Nightingale, and discusses how doctors would view these eager young women entering the field. She then ties that in with her own nascent desire to become a nurse, and describes her journey.

Patient care itself has not changed since the first nurse started doing her job; rather, it is the albatross of Health Insurance that has skewed how hospitals are run. The objectives are still the same; ease pain and suffering, provide a friendly face to those who worry about their loved ones, and advocate for those who have no voice.

Adams does all of these things and more – and tells how she tries to find joy in each day. One story that touched me a great deal was the gently used clothing bin she and other nurses created; for indigent patients whose clothing was soiled due to illness, or for those who simply didn’t have another change of clothes available. What a thoughtful thing to do – provide a basic human need at a time when it is needed the most.

As you read through this book, you will see that Adams is intent on keeping nurses in love with their job, by sharing her own struggles and solutions. Words of advice can be found on almost every page, with scenarios that show how Adams grew within her profession and how she overcame her own disillusionment. She is honest and open about her own strengths and weaknesses while telling us the lessons she has learned over the years. It is easy to see how each of her patients has touched her as their lives intersected.

The underlying intent of THE JOY OF NURSING is obvious – Adams has done a wonderful job of sharing the love she has for her calling – and the message comes through loud and clear. The blurb notes that it is good for either new nursing graduates or for those who are feeling disillusioned.

We all need a bit of encouragement now and then; and this book will certainly provide that for nurses. Who will heal the healers? Adams understands that advice from someone who has “been there” is invaluable. She gives the field of nursing a valuable and necessary gift in this book

- Kyle Wendy Skultety - GimmeThatBook.com

A veteran R.N. for 50 years, Juliana Adams will say one gets the calling to be a nurse "if you're lucky." 

At one time or another, most people will have come in contact with a nurse, whether because they have been sick or injured, or a have been with someone who is. It's often their dedication, touch, and connectedness one remembers. The "bad" nurses will be remembered, too--the ones who made you feel uncared for, unimportant, invisible. 

THE JOY OF NURSING: Reclaiming Our Nobility (Steamboat Springs Publishing, May 2016) by Juliana Adams, R.N., M.S.N., M.A. is about the author's journey to be the best nurse possible, challenges in the profession, reevaluating her concept of nobility, and so much more. 

The stories are often raw, unfiltered, and revealing in nature, but done in a tasteful way in which the beginning (or aspiring nurse) can get a stunning glimpse of what the profession is really like. From her first job as a graduate nurse at a more cushy hospital to one in a grittier E.R. (Denver General), through administration/management, going back to school, and speaking/advocacy, Juliana will take your hand through the bowels of critical care nursing and help you rekindle your nursing spirit, reinforce your decision, and just be a gentle hand to lead the way. 

THE JOY OF NURSING is at once a memoir of the profession, but also a guide for the disillusioned, and those in the trenches. 

- Leslie Lindsey - LeslieLindsey.com

Did it make me cry?:   I definitely teared up a couple times. There is so much of the material I could relate you. As Juliana told story after story of caring for people in the emergency department I felt proud of my profession and inspired to love it again even though at times it is easy to focus on only the negative. I loved the reminder that the work we do is vast and deep infiltrates so many lives daily.

In fact, I read this book in the summer at a time when I felt really disenfranchised with life and especially nursing. I hadn’t been taking good care of myself and was left with very little to give to even my family, let alone my patients and coworkers.

Shortly after reading it I stopped blogging but Juliana’s words have stuck with me. Even when it’s challenging I do believe that nursing can be a calling.

She begins her memoirs as a new nurse, fully enamored with the profession, nervous and excited as I’m sure most of us were.

It made me realize how long ago those days were for me! I remember feeling as if each new patient was a privilege. I approached new skills with awe and anticipation and a little trepidation. I recently had a student and was reminded how far I’ve come. Things I used to do with the utmost care and have become second nature. Comfort and ease can be a good thing but it’s also easy to become complacent.

I related to Juliana’s emergency room nursing days as well, where everything seemed to click. There are days where I love my job and know it matters. I also related to her later experience of feeling like things were changing. The feeling of knowing what needs to change and feeling powerless to change it.

Sometimes, I feel like I might be stuck there, but the rest of Juliana’s story gives me hope. I look up to her and her experience and courage as she has stepped beyond bedside nursing.

Her passion for improving the nursing profession has inspired me. The book gave me a lot to think about. I feel like I’m in a transition period, my kids are still little, I like bedside nursing a lot of the time, but sometimes I have so many ideas for how to make it better. My love of nursing is slowly transforming into a love for nurses and the precious work that we do.

I hope I too can use my words to encourage and inspire the profession, maybe even one day write a book. Juliana’s book was part story, part reality, and part inspiration, and I hope if I ever have the opportunity, that I can offer the same types of words to the nursing community.

Who Should Read It?

Nurses should definitely read this book!  I think it’s a good book for anyone wanting to go into the nursing profession or early in their career. However, I think those of use that are creeping into the years of burn out and frustration will be the most inspired and relate the most to her words. I certainly did.

My Recommendation:

The Joy of Nursing was an easy read. Juliana tells her story of nursing in a way that many nurses can relate to. It is also a worthwhile read for a glimpse into a very complex profession from someone who has examined their career through many phases.

- Jenn's Review - CryandNurseon.com

This book was written by JULIANA ADAMS who has dedicated over 50 (yes, 50) years of her life to nursing and taking care of patients.

In her introduction she states: “Much of what nurses do remains unclear to those outside the profession… This book… is intended for those considering becoming a nurse and nurses presently practicing who may have become disillusioned along the way.”

Although I am neither a nurse, nor an aspiring nurse, I still think this book has value in it for myself as well as for other adults.

I have (unfortunately) had dealings with hospitals and nurses on multiple occasions both as a patient myself, and as a concerned loved one.

I have dealt with nurses from a variety of specialties and departments and I can personally attest to the fact that the majority of caregiving in any hospital is done by the nurses, NOT the doctors.

Reading this book reminded me of how helpless I felt while sitting at my husband’s bedside while he was in a coma battling for his life. It was not the doctor’s in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) that patiently explained the numerous tubes and drains attached to my husband’s body. It was not a doctor that offered me comfort or encouragement. It was the nurses.

"In the most helpless moments of our lives, we must truly rely upon the kindness of strangers.” – Daniel F. Chambliss (Author)

I cannot imagine the stresses placed upon nurses on a daily basis and I truly believe that having word “nobility” in the title of this book is appropriate. I believe that nursing truly is a noble profession and one that is often underpaid and under appreciated. According to the author: “Nobility is a word that you don’t hear that often today in regards to many professions.” She is correct.

In her 50 years of experience, Juliana has accumulated a vast array of knowledge as well as many stories and anecdotes. She is acutely aware that nurses can become overwhelmed by the politics and the lack of resources that they face on a daily basis.

I believe that this book is an important one, since it reminds people that while there are discouraging moments in any profession, there are also moments of amazement and unparalleled kindness and connection. This is especially true in the nursing profession.

Imagine having to change a homeless person’s clothes that are so grime covered that the smell alone would repel most people, then having to clean up after a baby with the flu and having to do all this with a smile on your face. Then, imagine that mere minutes later, you are needed to hold the hand of an elderly patient as their spirit leaves their body and they pass on in death. The emotional  (and physical) toll must be almost more than one person can bear. Most people (myself included) would not be able to do these things day in and day out.

The stories in this book are sometimes sad, sometimes happy, and always awe-inspiring. They remind the reader of the importance of nursing and nurses to the patients they serve and to the health care system as a whole.

Without nurses our health care system would collapse. Juliana Adams does a wonderful job of reminding readers just how important nurses are. I love the chapter titles she chose. Each one is unique and most made me smile. For example, chapter two’s title is “It All Started with a Lie to a Nun and chapter five’s title is “Oops, Maybe I Wasn’t as Smart as I Thought I Was.”

This book should be required reading for all current and aspiring nurses. I believe it should be added to the nursing student’s syllabus so that they can learn from Juliana’s many years of experience.

I also firmly believe that this book will appeal to many other people as well. It is a fascinating glimpse into the inner world of real nursing (not the sanitized view of nurses that we all see on television.)

If you know anyone who is a nurse or who is going into nursing, you need to buy them a copy of this book.

Poignant and thought-provoking. This is an excellent read.

- Amie Gaudet - Amie's Book Review Blog