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Exposed

A Rosato & DiNunzio Novel

Lisa Scottoline

Paperback

List Price: 16.99*
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Other Editions of This Title:
Digital Audiobook (8/14/2017)
Paperback (12/29/2020)
Mass Market (7/28/2020)
Paperback, Large Print (7/17/2018)
CD-Audio (8/15/2017)
Hardcover, Large Print (9/9/2017)

Description

From the New York Times bestselling author comes the much-anticipated fifth book in the Rosato & DiNunzio thriller series, Lisa Scottoline's Exposed.

A BATTLE FOR JUSTICE PITS PARTNER AGAINST PARTNER...

Mary DiNunzio wants to represent her old friend Simon Pensiera, a sales rep who was wrongly fired by his company, but her partner Bennie Rosato represents the parent company. When she confronts Mary, explaining this is a conflict of interest, an epic battle of wills and legal strategy between the two ensues—ripping the law firm apart, forcing everyone to take sides and turning friend against friend.

SOMETIMES LOYALTY CAN BE LETHAL.

St. Martin's Griffin, 9781250099723, 368pp.

Publication Date: July 17, 2018



About the Author

Lisa Scottoline is the New York Times bestselling author of novels including Look Again, Lady Killer, Think Twice, Save Me and Everywhere That Mary Went. She also writes a weekly column, “Chick Wit,” with her daughter Francesca Serritella, for The Philadelphia Inquirer. The columns have been collected in Why My Third Husband Will Be a Dog and My Nest Isn’t Empty, It Just Has More Closet Space. She has won an Edgar® Award and Cosmopolitan magazine’s “Fun Fearless Fiction” Award, and she is the president of Mystery Writers of America. She teaches a course on justice and fiction at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, her alma mater. She lives in the Philadelphia area.


Conversation Starters from ReadingGroupChoices.com

1. What do you think about the relationship between Bennie & Mary, both on a personal and on a business level? How does it evolve through the course of the novel? Where do you think they stand at the end of the book compared to the beginning?


2. Throughout the novel, Mary talks about not wanting to “let the neighborhood down.” How do you think being so connected to her community has affected the choices Mary makes in life? Do you have a similar strong sense of community in your life, either in your neighborhood or as part of another group?


3. The mix of personal and professional is always difficult. Do you think Mary did the right thing in taking Simon’s case, regardless of legal rules and the potential damage to her partnership with Bennie? Why or why not?


4. What do you think about the difference in Mary & Bennie’s law style – Bennie is much more about confrontation, while Mary’s practice is local and relationship based. Do you think one is inherently better than the other?


5. Does one of the central struggles of the book – a father trying to provide for his daughter and pay her medical bills – resonate with you or anyone you know? Where do you think parents and children find the inner strength it takes to keep going when they are experiencing a tragedy like Rachel’s diagnosis?


6. On page 113, Bennie is reflecting on her own childhood and thinks, “She relied on herself and had made her life into what she wanted it to be, gloriously on her own.” How did her upbringing and this kind of thinking affect Bennie? Do you think this intense self-reliance is positive or negative? In what ways?


7. In Exposed, Judy finds herself in a moral dilemma, caught between two friends. Have you ever found yourself in a similar situation? How did you handle it? Do you think Judy navigated the situation well?


8. Did the ending of the novel take you by surprise? How do you think going back to the novel knowing the end would affect your reading experience? Can you identify any foreshadowing of things to come in the first half of the story?


9. Throughout the novel, Mary is carrying the expectations of her partner, her family, her friends, and her community. How does Mary react to the intense pressure? Can you see ways in which it affects her decisions and actions?


10. Near the end of the novel, Mary says to Simon, “We’re all worried about each other,” and he replies, “That’s love.” What different kinds of love can be found throughout this novel? How do the different characters show their love for each other in different ways?