The Day the World Went Nuclear (Hardcover)

Dropping the Atom Bomb and the End of World War II in the Pacific

By Bill O'Reilly

Henry Holt and Co. (BYR), 9781250120335, 320pp.

Publication Date: June 20, 2017

List Price: 19.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Autumn 1944. World War II is nearly over in Europe, but in the Pacific, American soldiers face an enemy who will not surrender, despite a massive and mounting death toll. Meanwhile, in Los Alamos, New Mexico, Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer and his team of scientists are preparing to test the deadliest weapon known to mankind. Newly inaugurated president Harry Truman faces the most important political decision in history: whether to use that weapon.

Adapted from Bill O'Reilly's historical thriller Killing the Rising Sun, with characteristically gripping storytelling, this story explores the decision to use the atom bomb and the end of World War II in the Pacific.



About the Author

Bill O'Reilly is a trailblazing TV journalist who has experienced unprecedented success on cable news and in writing thirteen national number-one bestselling nonfiction books. There are currently more than 17 million books in the Killing series in print. He lives in Long Island.


Praise For The Day the World Went Nuclear: Dropping the Atom Bomb and the End of World War II in the Pacific

The Day the President Was Shot:

"History buffs will enjoy this, and those for whom the Reagan administration is long ago and far away will be taken by an episode that still chills." —Booklist

Hitler's Last Days:

"A skillfully organized overview of the fall of the Third Reich, O’Reilly’s summary coordinates text with graphic photos for maximum impact." —VOYA, starred review

"A helpful additional resource for social studies students and WWII buffs." —Booklist

Kennedy's Last Days:
“A thoroughly documented, visually rich presentation.” —Kirkus Reviews

Lincoln's Last Days:

“This thrillerlike adaptation captures the excitement of the Union victory in the Civil War and the shock and horror that quickly followed as the country learned of Lincoln's death and sought revenge on his assassins. The popularity of O'Reilly's adult title will drive interest in this version, but it definitely stands alone and will find an audience among general readers and report writers.” —School Library Journal

“Accessible to younger readers.” —Booklist