A Hundred Suns (Hardcover)

By Karin Tanabe

St. Martin's Press, 9781250231475, 400pp.

Publication Date: April 7, 2020

Other Editions of This Title:
Digital Audiobook (4/6/2020)
CD-Audio (4/7/2020)

List Price: 27.99*
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Description

"A haunting, evocative tale that left me both richly satisfied and deeply unsettled – yet another Tanabe triumph. Captivating, suspenseful, and full of surprises." —Fiona Davis, national bestselling author of The Masterpiece

An evocative historical novel set in 1930's Indochine, about the American wife of a Michelin heir who journeys to the French colony in the name of family fortune, and the glamorous, tumultuous world she finds herself in—and the truth she may be running from.

On a humid afternoon in 1933, American Jessie Lesage steps off a boat from Paris and onto the shores of Vietnam. Accompanying her French husband Victor, an heir to the Michelin rubber fortune, she’s certain that their new life is full of promise, for while the rest of the world is sinking into economic depression, Indochine is gold for the Michelins. Jessie knows that their vast plantations near Saigon are the key to the family’s prosperity, and while they have been marred in scandal, she needs them to succeed for her husband’s sake—and to ensure that her trail of secrets stays hidden in the past.

Jessie dives into the glamorous colonial world, where money is king and morals are brushed aside, and meets Marcelle de Fabry, a spellbinding French woman with a moneyed Indochinese lover, the silk tycoon Khoi Nguyen. Descending on Jessie’s world like a hurricane, Marcelle proves to be an exuberant guide to ex-pat life. But hidden beneath her vivacious exterior is a fierce desire to put the colony back in the hands of its people, starting with the Michelin plantations, fueled by a terrible wrong committed against her and Khoi’s loved ones in Paris.

Yet it doesn’t take long for the sun-drenched days and champagne-soaked nights to catch up with Jessie. With an increasingly fractured mind, her affection for Indochine falters. And as a fiery political struggle builds around her, Jessie begins to wonder what’s real in a friendship that she suspects may be nothing but a house of cards.

Motivated by love, driven by ambition, and seeking self-preservation at all costs, Jessie and Marcelle each toe the line between friend and foe, ethics and excess. Cast against the stylish backdrop of 1930s Indochine, in a time and place defined by contrasts and convictions, A Hundred Suns is historical fiction at its lush, suspenseful best.



About the Author

Karin Tanabe is the author of The Diplomat's Daughter, The Gilded Years, The Price of Inheritance, and The List. A former Politico reporter, her writing has also appeared in the The Washington Post, Miami Herald, Chicago Tribune, and Newsday. She has made frequent appearances as a celebrity and politics expert on Entertainment Tonight, CNN, and The CBS Early Show. A graduate of Vassar College, Karin lives in Washington, DC.


Praise For A Hundred Suns

Praise for Karin Tanabe:

"A haunting, evocative tale that left me both richly satisfied and deeply unsettled – yet another Tanabe triumph. Captivating, suspenseful, and full of surprises." —Fiona Davis, national bestselling author of The Masterpiece

"Tanabe's attachment to her characters and passion for the period shine through." —Historical Novel Society

"A gorgeously sweeping tale." —Kirkus

"Tanabe immerses the reader in a world of romance and manners, but also leaves you gripping the edge of your seat." —USA Today

"Through richly drawn characters, Tanabe insigntfully grapples with complex and compelling issues." —Booklist

"A Hundred Suns manages the near impossible: it's both a gripping, relevant page turner, and a searing historical examination--in this case, of the brutal atrocities of colonialism. You'll read, as I did, to find out who will win the game of cat and mouse, even as you come to understand that in Indochine in the 1930's--as it is anywhere that one group of people enslaves another--there was no 'winning.' " - Miranda Beverly-Whittemore, New York Times bestselling author of Bittersweet and June