The Immortal Game: A History of Chess or How 32 Carved Pieces on a Board Illuminated Our Understanding of War, Art, Science, and the Huma (Paperback)

A History of Chess or How 32 Carved Pieces on a Board Illuminated Our Understanding of War, Art, Science, and the Huma

By David Shenk

Anchor Books, 9781400034086, 327pp.

Publication Date: October 2, 2007

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Description

A fresh, engaging look at how 32 carved pieces on a board forever changed our understanding of war, art, science, and the human brain.

Chess is the most enduring and universal game in history. Here, bestselling author David Shenk chronicles its intriguing saga, from ancient Persia to medieval Europe to the dens of Benjamin Franklin and Norman Schwarzkopf. Along the way, he examines a single legendary game that took place in London in 1851 between two masters of the time, and relays his own attempts to become as skilled as his Polish ancestor Samuel Rosenthal, a nineteenth-century champion. With its blend of cultural history and Shenk's lively personal narrative, The Immortal Game is a compelling guide for novices and aficionados alike.



About the Author

David Shenk is the nationally bestselling author of six books, including The Genius in All of Us, The Immortal Game, The Forgetting, and Data Smog. He has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Harper's, National Geographic, Slate, NPR, and PBS, among others. He lives in Brooklyn.


Praise For The Immortal Game: A History of Chess or How 32 Carved Pieces on a Board Illuminated Our Understanding of War, Art, Science, and the Huma

"Elegant . . .  a true page-turner, and a superb introduction to the game of chess."—Wall Street Journal“Clear, elegant, sophisticated and easy to understand. . . . Just the thing to get you in the thrall of this ancient game.” —Los Angeles Times“Shenk, a spry writer....[offers] a strong case for the game’s bewitching power.” —The New York Times Book Review“Fresh and fascinating...a world-spanning story [Shenk] relates with skill and verve.” —Chicago Sun-Times

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