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What It Is Like To Go To War (Digital Audiobook)

By Karl Marlantes, Jeff Harding (Narrator)

Publication Date: December 31, 2011

Other Editions of This Title:
Digital Audiobook (8/29/2011)
Hardcover (8/30/2011)
Paperback (9/11/2012)
Audio Cassette (8/1/2011)
Hardcover (1/1/2012)
Paperback (1/1/2012)
MP3 CD (8/30/2011)
Compact Disc (8/30/2011)
Compact Disc (8/30/2011)

October 2011 Indie Next List

“This is a courageous, noble, and intelligent grapple with myth, history, and spirituality that beautifully elevates the conversation on the role of the military in today's world. Marlantes volunteers his knowledge and experience (and really, his soul) to the cause of crafting the model of a just and ethical warrior in the 21st century. The long-overdue reckoning that Marlantes' novel Matterhorn deftly demanded of America is enhanced and extended with this new work. It is an emotional, honest, and affecting primer for all Americans on war and the national psyche. We ignore this book at our own peril.”
— Ed Conklin, Chaucer's Books, Santa Barbara, CA
View the List

Fall '12 Reading Group List

“This is a courageous, noble, and intelligent grapple with myth, history, and spirituality that beautifully elevates the conversation on the role of the military in today's world. Marlantes volunteers his knowledge and experience (and really, his soul) to the cause of crafting the model of a just and ethical warrior in the 21st century. The long-overdue reckoning that Marlantes' novel Matterhorn deftly demanded of America is enhanced and extended with this new work. It is an emotional, honest, and affecting primer for all Americans on war and the national psyche. We ignore this book at our own peril.”
— Ed Conklin, Chaucer's Books, Santa Barbara, CA
View the List

Description

Karl Marlantes left University at 22 to serve in the Vietnam War. Matterhorn was the bestselling novel based on his experiences. Now Marlantes takes us back to Vietnam, but this time there is no fictional veil. It is part exorcism of Karl's own experiences of combat, part confession, part philosophical primer for the young man about to enter combat. It is also a devastatingly frank answer to the questions ‘What is it like to face death?' and 'What is it like to kill someone?'