Ada's Ideas (Hardcover)

The Story of Ada Lovelace, the World's First Computer Programmer

By Fiona Robinson

Abrams Books for Young Readers, 9781419718724, 40pp.

Publication Date: August 2, 2016

List Price: 17.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Ada Lovelace (1815–1852) was the daughter of Lord Byron, a poet, and Anna Isabella Milbanke, a mathematician. Her parents separated when she was young, and her mother insisted on a logic-focused education, rejecting Byron’s “mad” love of poetry. But Ada remained fascinated with her father and considered mathematics “poetical science.” Via her friendship with inventor Charles Babbage, she became involved in “programming” his Analytical Engine, a precursor to the computer, thus becoming the world’s first computer programmer. This picture book biography of Ada Lovelace is a compelling portrait of a woman who saw the potential for numbers to make art.


About the Author

Fiona Robinson is the author/illustrator of Whale Shines and What Animals Really Like, among other picture books. What Animals Really Like received the 2012 Irma Black Award, and Bank Street named it one of the 2012 Best Children’s Books. Her work has been honored by the Royal Academy of Arts.


Praise For Ada's Ideas: The Story of Ada Lovelace, the World's First Computer Programmer

"This picture-book biography clearly conveys Lovelace’s constricted upbringing, her intellectual brilliance, and her pleasure in applying her mind to a complex challenge."


"Robinson celebrates Lovelace for her powerful analytical mind in spite of an overbearing mother, an absent father, and a restrictive social position... A fascinating and uplifting STEAM selection, highly recommended for biography collections."


"Colored and cut paper collage, with design elements stacked for depth and then photographed, underscore the theme of creativity expressed through numbers."


"Robinson’s writing is direct and deft... and mostly accessible to younger readers. But what really steal the show are her whimsical illustrations: paper cutouts arranged in layers and photographed for a striking collage effect."