World Make Way (Hardcover)

New Poems Inspired by Art from The Metropolitan Museum

By The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Lee Bennett Hopkins

Abrams Books for Young Readers, 9781419728457, 48pp.

Publication Date: March 27, 2018

List Price: 16.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

“Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.” —Leonardo da Vinci
 
Based on this simple statement by Leonardo, eighteen poets have written new poems inspired by some of the most popular works in the collection of The Metropolitan Museum. The collection represents a wide range of poets and artists, including acclaimed children’s poets Marilyn Singer, Alma Flor Alda, and Carole Boston Weatherford and popular artists such as Mary Cassatt, Fernando Botero, Winslow Homer, and Utagawa Hiroshige.
 
Accompanying the artwork and specially commissioned poems is an introduction, biographies of each poet and artist, and an index.


About the Author

The Metropolitan Museum of Art is the largest museum in the Western Hemisphere and the world’s most encyclopedic art museum. Founded in 1870, the Museum embraces more than two million works of art spanning 5,000 years of world culture, from prehistory to the present, in all artistic media, and at the highest levels of creative excellence.


Lee Bennett Hopkins is an award-winning author and poet. He has published more than 100 books of poetry, including City I Love and Behind the Museum Door. He lives in Cape Coral, Florida.


Praise For World Make Way: New Poems Inspired by Art from The Metropolitan Museum

"The book’s true spotlight is on diversity—in the background of the poets, the style of the artworks, and the method of interpretation chosen by each poet . . . The poems emphasize that in art and poetry there is no right answer, rather a myriad of different interpretations. Accordingly, there is something for every young reader in this delightful collection."
 

— Booklist

"The specially commissioned poems, which easily lend themselves to reading aloud, are well matched with their individual artwork and can be excellent springboards for further discussion about the picture."

— School Library Journal


Coverage from NPR