Hollywood Double Agent (Hardcover)

The True Tale of Boris Morros, Film Producer Turned Cold War Spy

By Jonathan Gill

Harry N. Abrams, 9781419740091, 336pp.

Publication Date: April 7, 2020

List Price: 27.00*
* Individual store prices may vary.


About the Author

Jonathan Gill is a professor of American history and culture at the University of Amsterdam, formerly on the faculties of Columbia, CCNY, Fordham, and the Manhattan School of Music. He has written for the New York Times, the Village Voice, The Nation, the Guardian, and other publications. He divides his time between New York City and Amsterdam.


Praise For Hollywood Double Agent: The True Tale of Boris Morros, Film Producer Turned Cold War Spy

“Shaking up our stock images of Cold War espionage, Gill’s real-life thriller uncovers the improbable tale of a Russian Jewish immigrant impresario who played both the FBI and the KGB for fools. The result is a riveting read.”

— James Loeffler

“A Hollywood mover and shaker takes center stage in a brisk tale of spies and counterspies.. . . In a narrative that reads like an espionage thriller, Gill follows his subject’s peripatetic travels and interactions with malevolent, powerful—and sometimes bumbling—characters.”

— Kirkus

"With this fascinating and detailed narrative, Gill (American history & culture Univ. of Amsterdam) proves the adage that truth is stranger than fiction. . . Gill’s captivating, fast-paced narrative reads like a thriller and will leave readers wanting more. Highly recommended for those who love stories of espionage.”

— Library Journal

“Readers of Hollywood Double Agent may come for the glitter, but they'll stay for the intrigue. Although Gill's book reads like a Cold War thriller, at heart it's the amazing true story of an American dream gone wrong. . . . Like a multiplex blockbuster, this biography of a Russian-born Hollywood player turned spy has it all: intrigue, glamour, humor, romance and danger.”

— Shelf Awareness

“[Jonathan Gill’s] work is convincing and extensive, in addition to being well-written and perceptive. His subject, Boris Morrow, was an empty vessel who could be turned left or right depending on how it satisfied his personal interest.” 

— New York Journal of Books