Skip to main content


Daisy Miller

Joseph Conrad, Henry James

Paperback

List Price: 7.20*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (10/2/2019)
Paperback (7/12/2020)
Paperback (2/24/2019)
Paperback (6/19/2019)
Paperback (4/16/2017)
Paperback (10/27/2013)
Paperback (8/11/2015)
Paperback (12/2/2018)
Paperback (8/16/2018)
Paperback (5/26/2010)
Paperback (9/7/2018)
Paperback (12/6/2019)
Paperback (2/19/2016)
Paperback (9/28/2013)
Paperback (1/8/2014)
Paperback, Spanish (2/28/2014)
Paperback (10/5/2016)

Description

Daisy Miller was first published in England by Henry James in 1878 in Cornhill Magazine, and then in 1979 by Harper & Brothers.
The Author takes as pretext the life of the beautiful Daisy to show prejudices and different thoughts of Americans towards Europeans and vice versa.
In a letter James said that Daisy is the victim of a social rumpus that goes on either over her head or beneath her notice.

Henry James (1843-1916), who was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1911, 1912 and 1916, was american but he spent the most of his career in Britain. He is still one of the most important writers of the 19th-century.

This book contains a special note on Henry James by Joseph Conrad (Henry James. An appreciation, 1905) and a detailed bibliography including all the publications of the Author.

Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, 9781512212815, 106pp.

Publication Date: May 14, 2015



About the Author

Henry James, OM (15 April 1843 - 28 February 1916) was an American-English writer who spent most of his writing career in Britain. He is regarded as one of the key figures of 19th-century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James. James alternated between America and Europe for the first 20 years of his life; eventually he settled in England, becoming a British subject in 1915, one year before his death. He is best known for a number of novels showing Americans encountering Europe and Europeans. His method of writing from the point of view of a character within a tale allows him to explore issues related to consciousness and perception, and his style in later works has been compared to impressionist painting.