A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (Paperback)

Berkeley's Treatise

By George Berkeley

Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, 9781537427539, 52pp.

Publication Date: September 1, 2016

Other Editions of This Title:
Paperback (10/29/2017)
Paperback (12/22/2017)
Paperback (2/9/2018)
Paperback (1/16/2017)
Paperback (4/26/2017)
Paperback (11/10/2017)
Paperback (7/3/2017)
Paperback (12/17/2017)
Paperback (8/12/2017)
Paperback (3/20/2017)
Hardcover (4/19/2018)
Paperback (12/10/2016)
Paperback (11/3/2017)
Paperback (4/29/2018)
Paperback (4/8/2017)
Paperback (9/24/2016)
Paperback (12/14/2018)
Paperback (4/26/2018)
Paperback (6/23/2018)

List Price: 8.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge - George Berkeley - A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (commonly called Treatise when referring to Berkeley's works) is a 1710 work, in English, by Anglo-Irish Empiricist philosopher George Berkeley. This book largely seeks to refute the claims made by Berkeley's contemporary John Locke about the nature of human perception. Whilst, like all the Empiricist philosophers, both Locke and Berkeley agreed that we are having experiences, regardless of whether material objects exist, Berkeley sought to prove that the outside world (the world which causes the ideas one has within one's mind) is also composed solely of ideas. Berkeley did this by suggesting that "Ideas can only resemble Ideas" - the mental ideas that we possess can only resemble other ideas (not material objects) and thus the external world consists not of physical form, but rather of ideas. This world is (or, at least, was) given logic and regularity by some other force, which Berkeley concludes is God. Philosophy being nothing else but the study of wisdom and truth, it may with reason be expected that those who have spent most time and pains in it should enjoy a greater calm and serenity of mind, a greater clearness and evidence of knowledge, and be less disturbed with doubts and difficulties than other men. Yet so it is, we see the illiterate bulk of mankind that walk the high-road of plain common sense, and are governed by the dictates of nature, for the most part easy and undisturbed. To them nothing that is familiar appears unaccountable or difficult to comprehend. They complain not of any want of evidence in their senses, and are out of all danger of becoming Sceptics.