Simply Lasting (Paperback)

Writers on Jane Kenyon

By Joyce Peseroff (Editor)

Graywolf Press, 9781555974299, 256pp.

Publication Date: September 1, 2005

List Price: 17.00*
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Description

In personal and critical essays, letters, poems, an interview, and reviews by writers around the country, Jane Kenyon's life and works are considered and celebrated for their tenacity, spirit, and timeless charm. Simply Lasting includes new responses to Kenyon's poetry and reviews and criticism written during her lifetime, as well as never-before-published letters from Kenyon herself. Poet, editor, and longtime friend of Kenyon, Joyce Peseroff has gathered writings that affirm Kenyon's place as one of America's most important recent poets. "That there will be no more writing by Jane Kenyon," Peseroff writes in her Introduction, "is one of the terrible losses that might have been otherwise."

Contributors include: Wendell Berry, Robert Bly, Hayden Carruth, Michael Dirda, Donald Hall, Robert Hass, Marie Howe, Galway Kinnell, Peter Kramer, Maxine Kumin, Alice Mattison, Molly Peacock, Robert Pinsky, Jean Valentine, and many others.



About the Author

Joyce Peseroff is the author of three collections of poems with a forthcoming collection, Eastern Mountain Time, from Carnegie Mellon University Press in 2006. She grew up in New York City and currently resides in Massachusetts, where she is on the faculty of the University of Massachusetts, Boston.



Praise For Simply Lasting: Writers on Jane Kenyon

“Kenyon writes prose the way she writes poetry, turning simple or frankly unbeautiful things sideways and inviting us to see what they offer us to love. Some of the most moving essays here chronicle her quest to make peace with Christianity, and in an introduction her husband, the poet Donald Hall, recalls a vision that left her 'in a quiet, exalted, shining mood.' We leave this book the same way.” —New Yorker

“Her words, with their quiet, rapt force, their pensiveness and wit, come to us from natural speech, from the Bible and hymns, from which she derived the singular psalmlike music that is hers alone.” —New York Times Book Review