Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator (Paperback)

Confessions of a Media Manipulator

By Ryan Holiday

Portfolio, 9781591846284, 301pp.

Publication Date: July 2, 2013

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Description

The cult classic that predicted the rise of fake news--revised and updated for the post-Trump, post-Gawker age.

Hailed as "astonishing and disturbing" by the Financial Times and "essential reading" by TechCrunch at its original publication, former American Apparel marketing director Ryan Holiday's first book sounded a prescient alarm about the dangers of fake news. It's all the more relevant today.

Trust Me, I'm Lying was the first book to blow the lid off the speed and force at which rumors travel online--and get "traded up" the media ecosystem until they become real headlines and generate real responses in the real world. The culprit? Marketers and professional media manipulators, encouraged by the toxic economics of the news business.

Whenever you see a malicious online rumor costs a company millions, politically motivated fake news driving elections, a product or celebrity zooming from total obscurity to viral sensation, or anonymously sourced articles becoming national conversation, someone is behind it. Often someone like Ryan Holiday.

As he explains, "I wrote this book to explain how media manipulators work, how to spot their fingerprints, how to fight them, and how (if you must) to emulate their tactics. Why am I giving away these secrets? Because I'm tired of a world where trolls hijack debates, marketers help write the news, opinion masquerades as fact, algorithms drive everything to extremes, and no one is accountable for any of it. I'm pulling back the curtain because it's time the public understands how things really work. What you choose to do with this information is up to you.


About the Author

RYAN HOLIDAY is the bestselling author of The Obstacle Is the Way, Ego Is the Enemy, Growth Hacker Marketing, Perennial Seller, and other books about marketing, culture, and the human condition. His work has been translated into twenty-eight languages and has appeared everywhere from the Columbia Journalism Review to Fast Company. His company, Brass Check, has advised companies such as Google, TASER, and Complex, as well as multiplatinum musicians and some of the biggest authors in the world. He lives in Austin, Texas.


Praise For Trust Me, I'm Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator

“Holiday is part Machiavelli, part Ogilvy, and all results…this whiz kid is the secret weapon you’ve never heard of.”—Tim Ferriss, author of The 4-Hour Workweek “Essential reading.”—Andrew Keen “Ryan Holiday's brilliant exposé of the unreality of the Internet should be required reading for every thinker in America.”— Edward Jay Epstein, author of The Big Picture

“The strategies Ryan created to exploit blogs drove sales of millions of my books and made me an internationally known name.”—Tucker Max

“Behind my reputation as marketing genius there is Ryan Holiday, whom I consult often and has done more for my business than just about anyone.”—Dov Charney, CEO and founder, American Apparel

“Holiday has written more than a dyspeptic diatribe, as his precise prose and reference to the scholarship of others add weight to his claims. A sharp and disturbing look into the world of online reality.”Kirkus Reviews

“His focus is prescient and his schemes compelling. Media students and bloggers would do well to heed Holiday’s informative, timely, and provocative advice.”Publishers Weekly

“While the observation that the Internet favors speed over accuracy is hardly new, Holiday lays out how easily it is to twist it toward any end… Trust Me, I’m Lying provides valuable food for thought regarding how we receive — and perceive — information.”New York Post

“This is an astonishing book. Holiday has worked for several years as a self-proclaimed media manipulator, running campaigns for companies such as American Apparel. He is now intent on revealing the tricks that his kind use to influence us. Many of these stories are chilling.”—Gillian Tett, Financial Times

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