Lenny & Lucy (Hardcover)

By Philip C. Stead, Erin E. Stead (Illustrator)

Roaring Brook Press, 9781596439320, 40pp.

Publication Date: October 6, 2015

List Price: 17.99*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

Peter and his father are moving to a new house beyond the dark unfriendly woods. When they arrive at their new home, Peter wants to turn back. Fortunately, he has Harold for company, but Harold is just a dog and can't help Peter. Scared of the things hidden in the woods, Peter makes a tall pile of pillows. He stiches and sews. He pushes and pulls. And when he is done, he has Lenny, Guardian of the Bridge, to protect him and Harold.

Lenny is a good guard but Peter worries that Lenny will get lonely out by the woods all by himself, so he makes Lucy, who is a good friend. Together, Lenny, Lucy, Peter, and Harold discover that this new place isn't so scary after all.

This title has Common Core connections.



About the Author

PHILIP C. STEAD is the author of the Caldecott Medal winning A Sick Day for Amos McGee, also named a New York Times Best Illustrated Book of 2010 and a Publishers Weekly Best Children’s Book of 2010, illustrated by his wife, Erin E. Stead (A Neal Porter Book, Roaring Brook Press, 2010).  Philip, also an artist, both wrote and illustrated his debut Creamed Tuna Fish and Peas on Toast (Roaring Brook Press, 2009), which was applauded by School Library Journal for “its wry humor and illustrations worthy of a Roald Dahl creation.”  Philip lives with Erin in Ann Arbor, Michigan.



Philip C. Stead and Erin E. Stead are author and illustrator of A Sick Day for Amos McGee, winner of the Caldecott Medal. It is their first book together. Philip is also the author and illustrator of Creamed Tuna Fish and Peas on Toast. They divide their time between Ann Arbor, Michigan, and New York City.


Praise For Lenny & Lucy

“A quiet, comforting tale of finding where you belong.” —Booklist

“A wonderfully creative story of resilience and friendship.” —School Library Journal, starred review

“Hypnotic artwork and storytelling invite children to linger in the wild woods of worry and emerge intact, enriched, and utterly invigorated by this complex, contemporary fairy tale.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Erin Stead uses faded grays for the alien forest and warm, quiet color for the story's living souls. What stands out is the Steads' (Bear Has a Story to Tell) ability to evoke the wordless intimacy and companionship that every child needs-and will make for themselves, if necessary.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review