The Last September (Paperback)

By Nina de Gramont

Algonquin Books, 9781616206093, 336pp.

Publication Date: July 5, 2016

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Description

"If you liked The Girl on the Train, read The Last September, a literary whodunit set on Cape Cod, weaving a murder mystery with the emotionally intense story of a fraying marriage."--Newsday

"Impossible to put down . . . With an artist's eye and a poet's heart, de Gramont realizes a world of love, mystery, and the shattering sorrow of mental illness, deceit, hope, and lives cut short." --Library Journal, starred review


Brett has been in love with her husband, Charlie, from the day she laid eyes on him in college. When he is found murdered, Brett is devastated. But if she is honest with herself, their marriage had been hanging by a thread for quite some time.

All clues point to Charlie's mentally ill brother, Eli, but any number of people might have been driven to kill Charlie--a handsome, charismatic man who unwittingly damaged almost every life he touched. Brett is determined to understand how such a tragedy could have happened--and whether she was somehow complicit.

Set in the desolate autumn beauty of Cape Cod, this riveting emotional puzzle explores the psyche of a woman facing down the meaning of love and loyalty.

"The Last September is a wonderful, glowing book populated by characters that become a part of your life long after the last page has been turned. It is the type of novel writers admire and readers long for." --Jason Mott, author of The Returned

"Brilliant rendering of love story and murder mystery . . . I was hooked by the first paragraph, which somehow contains all the beautiful, luminous grief of the whole story, and I truly did not want to let it go in the end." --Brad Watson, author of Aliens in the Prime of Their Lives

"A moody murder mystery . . . Boasts lovely, understated writing, sharply drawn settings . . . and, once again, characters who are irresistibly attractive, flawed, and dangerous . . . A fine literary whodunit from an accomplished storyteller." --Kirkus Reviews
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