Leaflets Three, Let It Be! (Hardcover)

The Story of Poison Ivy

By Anita Sanchez, Robin Brickman (Illustrator)

Boyds Mills Press, 9781620914458, 32pp.

Publication Date: April 7, 2015

List Price: 16.95*
* Individual store prices may vary.

Description

What's the first thing anyone hears about poison ivy? "Leaflets three, let it be!" But this engaging nonfiction book will surprise readers who fear the itch–inducing plant. Taking us through the year, the narrative introduces the rabbit who nibbles on the tender leaves after a hard winter, the salamander who shelters in the plant's cool, umbrella–shadows, the fall insects who wrap themselves in poison–ivy blankets, and the birds who feast on its berries in the starving heart of winter. Poison ivy has always seemed mysterious in its danger, but it too has a purpose and it has something to give.


About the Author

Anita Sanchez's books include the middle grade novel, The Invasion of Sandy Bay, and an adult book on the history of dandelions titled The Teeth of the Lion. She lives on a farm in upstate New York with her husband and two sons.
Robin Brickman's illustrations are three-dimensional images that she sculpts using watercolors, painted paper, scissors, and glue. Her books include A Log's Life and One Night in the Coral Sea, both of which were selected for the John Burroughs List of Nature Books for Young Readers; and Beaks!, which was a Junior Library Guild selection. She lives in western Massachusetts.


Praise For Leaflets Three, Let It Be!: The Story of Poison Ivy

This attractive informational picture book provides a strong overview of poison ivy. . . . Sanchez conveys solid information on this potentially irritating plant through a delightful narrative. . . . Brickman's detailed watercolors depict a host of varied wildlife interacting with the plant or coexisting with it. . . . Useful content becomes engaging and compelling. . . . A strong addition to biology and life studies units, this one may even save kids from an itchy experience.' —School Library Journal

Sanchez introduces a new perspective on this potentially itch-causing plant. . . . While most readers won't become cheerleaders for poison ivy, they will at least come away with a greater understanding of its importance and an increased ability to identify it.' —Kirkus Reviews